Annex I

Formatting Note

 Explanatory Notes

 

1. The Schedule of a Party to this Annex sets out, pursuant to Articles 10.13 (Non-

Conforming Measures) and 11.6 (Non-Conforming Measures), a Party’s existing measures that

are not subject to some or all of the obligations imposed by:

(a) Articles 10.3 (National Treatment) or 11.2 (National Treatment);

(b) Articles 10.4 (Most-Favored-Nation Treatment) or 11.3 (Most-Favored-Nation

Treatment); 

(c) Article 11.5 (Local Presence);

(d) Article 10.9 (Performance Requirements); 

(e) Article 10.10 (Senior Management and Boards of Directors); or

(f) Article 11.4 (Market Access).

2. Each Schedule entry sets out the following elements:

(a) Sector refers to the sector for which the entry is made;

(b) Obligations Concerned specifies the obligation(s) referred to in paragraph 1 that,

pursuant to Articles 10.13 (Non-Conforming Measures) and 11.6 (Non-

Conforming Measures), do not apply to the listed measure(s);

(c) Level of Government indicates the level of government maintaining the listed

measure(s);

(d) Measures identifies the laws, regulations, or other measures for which the entry is

made.  A measure cited in the Measures element:

(i) means the measure as amended, continued, or renewed as of the date of

entry into force of this Agreement, and

(ii) includes any subordinate measure adopted or maintained under the

authority of and consistent with the measure; and

(e) Description sets out commitments, if any, for liberalization on the date of entry

into force of the Agreement, and the remaining non-conforming aspects of the

existing measures for which the entry is made. 

3. In the interpretation of a Schedule entry, all elements of the entry shall be considered.  An

entry shall be interpreted in light of the relevant provisions of the Chapters against which the

entry is made.  To the extent that:

 

I-2

(a) the Measures element is qualified by a liberalization commitment from the

Description element, the Measures element as so qualified shall prevail over all

other elements; and

(b) the Measures element is not so qualified, the Measures element shall prevail

over all other elements, unless any discrepancy between the Measures element

and the other elements considered in their totality is so substantial and material

that it would be unreasonable to conclude that the Measures element should

prevail, in which case the other elements shall prevail to the extent of that

discrepancy.

4. In accordance with Article 10.13 (Non-Conforming Measures) and 11.6 (Non-

Conforming Measures), the articles of this Agreement specified in the Obligations Concerned

element of an entry do not apply to the law, regulation, or other measure identified in the

Measures element of that entry.

5. Where a Party maintains a measure that requires that a service provider be a citizen,

permanent resident, or resident of its territory as a condition to the provision of a service in its

territory, a Schedule entry for that measure taken with respect to Article 11.2 (National

Treatment), 11.3 (Most-Favored-Nation Treatment), or 11.5 (Local Presence) shall operate as a

Schedule entry with respect to Article 10.3 (National Treatment), 10.4 (Most-Favored-Nation

Treatment), or 10.9 (Performance Requirements) to the extent of that measure.

6. For greater certainty, Article 11.4 (Market Access) refers to non-discriminatory

measures.

Costa Rica Schedule

Schedule of Costa Rica

Sector: Irrigation Services

Obligations Concerned: Market Access (Article 11.4)

 

Level of Government: Central

 

Measures: Law No. 7593 of 9 August 1996 – Ley de la Autoridad Reguladora

de los Servicios Públicos – Arts. 5, 9, and 13

 

Description: Cross-Border Services

Costa Rica reserves the right to limit the number of concessions to

supply irrigation services based on demand for those services. 

Priority will be given to concessionaires already supplying the

service. 

 

.

ANNEX I, Schedule of Costa Rica

 

I-CR-2

Sector: Solid Waste Treatment Services

 

Obligations Concerned: Market Access (Article 11.4)

 

Level of Government: Central

 

Measures: Law No. 7593 of 9 August 1996 – Ley de la Autoridad Reguladora

de los Servicios Públicos – Arts. 5, 9, and 13

 

Description: Cross-Border Services

Costa Rica reserves the right to limit the number of concessions to

supply solid waste treatment services based on demand for those

services.  Priority will be given to concessionaires already

supplying the service.   

 

ANNEX I, Schedule of Costa Rica

 

I-CR-3

Sector: Maritime and Specialty Air Services 

 

Obligations Concerned: Market Access (Article 11.4) 

 

Level of Government: Central

 

Measures: Law No. 7593 of 9 August 1996 – Ley de la Autoridad Reguladora

de los Servicios Públicos – Arts. 5, 9, and 13

 

Description: Cross-Border Services

Costa Rica reserves the right to limit the number of concessions to

supply maritime and specialty air services in national ports based

on demand for those services.  Priority will be given to

concessionaires already supplying the service.

 

 

ANNEX I, Schedule of Costa Rica

 

I-CR-4

Sector: Professional Services

 

Obligations Concerned: National Treatment  (Article 11.2)

 Most-Favored-Nation Treatment  (Article 11.3)

 Local Presence (Article 11.5)

 

Level of Government: Central

 

Measures: Law No. 7221 of 6 April 1991 – Ley Orgánica del Colegio de

Ingenieros Agrónomos – Arts. 5, 6, 8, 10, 15, 16, 18, 19, 20, 23,

24, and 25  

Executive Decree No. 22688-MAG-MIRENEM of 22 November

1993 – Reglamento General de la Ley Orgánica del Colegio de

Ingenieros Agrónomos de Costa Rica – Arts. 6, 7, and 9 

Executive Decree No. 29410 of 2 March 2001 – Reglamento del

Registro de Peritos-Tasadores del Colegio de Ingenieros

Agrónomos – Arts. 6, 20, and 22

Law No. 5230 of 2 July 1973 – Ley Orgánica del Colegio de

Geólogos de Costa Rica – Arts. 3, and 9 

Executive Decree No. 6419-MEIC of 18 October 1976 –

Reglamento del Colegio de Geólogos de Costa Rica – Arts. 4, 5,

and 37

Law No. 5142 of 30 November 1972 – Ley Orgánica del Colegio

de Farmacéuticos de Costa Rica – Arts. 2, 9, and 10

Executive Decree No. 3503-S of 6 February 1974 – Reglamento

General Orgánico o Reglamento Interno del Colegio de

Farmacéuticos de Costa Rica – Art. 2 and 6

Law No. 5784 of 19 August 1975 – Ley Orgánica del Colegio de

Cirujanos Dentistas de Costa Rica – Arts. 2, 6, 9, 10, 14, and 15 

Law No. 4925 of 17 December 1971 – Reforma Integral a la Ley

Orgánica del Colegio Federado de Ingenieros y Arquitectos

Arts. 5, 9, 11, 13, 14, and 52

Executive Decree No. 3414-T of 3 December 1973 – Reglamento

Interior General del Colegio Federado de Ingenieros y Arquitectos

de Costa Rica –Arts. 1, 3, 7, 9, and 54 

ANNEX I, Schedule of Costa Rica

 

I-CR-5

Reglamento Especial de Incorporación al Colegio Federado de

Ingenieros y Arquitectos de Costa Rica, approved in Session 4-82-

A.E.R., 6 December 1982 – Arts. 7 and 8

Reglamento Especial para Determinar Inopia de Profesionales

para los Efectos de Miembro Temporal o Incorporación de

Extranjeros al Colegio Federado de Ingenieros y de Arquitectos de

Costa Rica, approved in Session 45-82-GE of December 1982 –

Arts. 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, and 8  

Law No. 1038 of 19 August 1947 – Ley de Creación del Colegio

de Contadores Públicos – Arts. 3, 4, 12, and 15 

Law No. 3455 of 14 November 1964 – Ley Orgánica del Colegio

de Médicos Veterinarios – Arts. 2, 4, 5, 7, and 27 

Executive Decree No. 19184-MAG of 10 July 1989 – Reglamento

a la Ley Orgánica del Colegio de Médicos Veterinarios – Arts. 6,

7, 10, 11, 19, and 24 

Law No. 2343 of 4 May 1959 – Ley Orgánica del Colegio de

Enfermeras de Costa Rica – Arts. 2, 22, 23, 24, and 28 

Executive Decree No. 11 of 10 August 1961 – Reglamento de la

Ley Número 2343 del 4 de mayo de 1959 que Crea el Colegio de

Enfermeras de Costa Rica  – Arts. 9, 10, 53, 54, and 67  

Law No. 7764 of 17 April 1998 – Código Notarial – Arts. 3 and 10

Law No. 1269 of 2 March 1951 – Ley Orgánica del Colegio de

Contadores Privados de Costa Rica– Arts. 2 and 4

Law No. 6038 of 13 January 1977 – Ley Orgánica del Colegio de

Químicos e Ingenieros Químicos de Costa Rica – Arts. 5, 10, 14,

15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, and 71 

Executive Decree No. 11275-P of 27 February 1980 – Reglamento

a la Ley Orgánica de Químicos e Ingenieros Químicos de Costa

Rica – Arts. 1, 2, 3, 8, 9, and 83 

Law No. 3019 of 9 August 1962 – Ley Orgánica del Colegio de

Médicos y Cirujanos – Arts. 4, 5, and 7   

Executive Decree No. 23110-S of 22 March 1991 – Reglamento a

la Ley Orgánica del Colegio de Médicos y Cirujanos – Art. 10  

ANNEX I, Schedule of Costa Rica

 

I-CR-6

Executive Decree No. 2613-SPSS of 3 November 1972 –

Reglamento General para Autorizar el Ejercicio a Profesionales

de Ramas Dependientes de las Ciencias Médicas y a Técnicos en

Materias Médico Quirúrgicas – Arts. 1 and 4  

Law No. 3838 of 19 December 1966 – Ley Orgánica del Colegio

de Optometristas de Costa Rica – Arts. 6 and 7 

Law No. 4420 of 18 September 1969 – Ley Orgánica del Colegio

de Periodistas de Costa Rica – Arts. 2, 24, 25, and 27

Executive Decree No. 14931 of 20 October 1983 – Reforma al

Reglamento de la Ley Orgánica del Colegio de Periodistas de

Costa Rica – Arts. 5, 6, and 26 

Law No. 7106 of 4 November 1988 – Ley Orgánica del Colegio de

Profesionales en Ciencias Políticas – Arts.6, 26, and 29 

Executive Decree No. 19026-P of 31 May 1989 – Reglamento a la

Ley Orgánica del Colegio de Profesionales en Ciencias Políticas y

de Relaciones Internacionales – Arts. 1, 10, 12, 19, 21, and 22

Law No. 8356 of 12 June 2002 – Reforma Ley Orgánica del

Colegio de Profesionales en Ciencias Políticas – Art. 1

Law No. 4288 of 12 December 1968 – Ley Orgánica del Colegio

de Biólogos – Arts. 6 and 7  

Executive Decree No. 39 of 6 March 1970 – Reglamento de la Ley

Orgánica del Colegio de Biólogos de Costa Rica – Arts.10, 11, 16,

17, 18, and 19 

Reglamento a la Ley Orgánica al Colegio de Bibliotecarios de

Costa Rica, approved in the ordinary General Assembly of 2

October 1991 – Arts. 12 and 17  

Law No. 7537 of 22 August 1995 – Ley Orgánica del Colegio de

Profesionales en Informática y Computación – Arts. 6 and 8 

Law No. 8142 of 17 October 2001 – Ley de Traducciones e

Interpretaciones Oficiales – Art. 6

Executive Decree No. 30167-RE of 25 January 2002 – Reglamento

a la Ley de Traducciones e Interpretaciones Oficiales – Art. 10

ANNEX I, Schedule of Costa Rica

 

I-CR-7

Law No. 7105 of 31 October 1988 – Ley Orgánica del Colegio de

Licenciados en Ciencias Económicas de Costa Rica – Arts. 4, 6,

15, 19, and 20 

Executive Decree No. 20014-MEIC of 19 September 1990 –

Reglamento General de Profesionales en Ciencias Económicas de

Costa Rica – Arts. 10, 14, and 17 

Law No. 7503 of 3 May 1995 – Ley Orgánica del Colegio de

Físicos – Arts. 6 and 10

Executive Decree No. 28035-MINAE-MICIT of 14 April 1999 –

Reglamento a la Ley Orgánica del Colegio de Físicos – Arts. 6, 7,

10, 11, 18, and 21 

Law No. 6144 of 28 November 1977 – Ley Orgánica del Colegio

Profesional de Psicólogos de Costa Rica – Arts. 4, 5, and 6 

Reglamento General del Colegio Profesional de Psicólogos de

Costa Rica, approved in Session No. 3 of the Ordinary General

Assembly of 09 March 1979 – Arts. 9, 10, and 11  

Executive Decree No. 28595-S of 23 March 2000 – Reglamento de

la Ley Orgánica del Colegio de Profesionales en Quiropráctica

Art. 15  

 

Description: Cross-Border Services and Investment

To join the Professional Associations of Public Accountants,

Pharmacists, Geologists, Physicians and Surgeons, Veterinarians,

Lawyers (i.e., Notaries), Dental Surgeons, Optometrists,

Journalists, Nurses, Medical and Surgical Technicians and Medical

Sciences Branches, all foreign professionals must prove that, in

their home jurisdiction where they are allowed to practice, Costa

Rican nationals can exercise their profession under like

circumstances. 

To join the Professional Associations of Public Accountants, 

Pharmacists, Geologists, Agronomical Engineers (Forestry or

Agriculture/Livestock Appraisers-Surveyors), Physicians and

Surgeons, Veterinarians, Dental Surgeons, Journalists, Medical and

Surgical Technicians and Medical Sciences Branches, Computer

and Information Technology, Nurses and Official Translators and

Interpreters, foreign professionals must have the migratory status

of residents in Costa Rica at the time of applying for membership,

as well as have a certain minimum number of years of residence. 

ANNEX I, Schedule of Costa Rica

 

I-CR-8

The number of years varies from one Professional Association to

another, but usually ranges between two to five years.

 

To join the Professional Associations of Lawyers (i.e., Notaries), 

Chemists and Chemical Engineers, Political Scientists and

International Relations Specialists and Physicists, foreign

professionals must have the migratory status of residents in Costa

Rica at the time of applying for membership. 

Only Costa Rican professionals duly registered in the Colegio de

Ingenieros Agrónomos can supply their services for consulting

enterprises in agronomical sciences operating in Costa Rica to

comply with the 50 percent legal requirement of total professional

consulting advisory time.

Consulting or advisory work in the field of agronomical sciences

carried out in Costa Rica under the auspices of foreign

governments or international institutions shall be jointly conducted

by Costa Rican nationals registered in the Colegio, along with

foreign nationals.

Foreign professionals in political sciences and international

relations specialists may only be hired by public or private entities

when they are active members of the Professional Association and

insufficiency of Costa Rican professionals has been declared.  

For greater certainty, subject to the conditions and terms included

in the applicable legislation, the following professional

associations may provide temporary licenses to allow temporary

professional practice in Costa Rica:  Biologists, Economists and

Social Scientists, Political Scientists and International Relations

Specialists, Dental Surgeons, Pharmacists, Physicists, Computer

and Information Technology Professionals, Agronomical

Engineers, Architects and Engineers, Physicians and Surgeons,

Veterinarians, Journalists, Psychologists, Chemists and Chemical

Engineers and Chiropractors.  

For greater certainty, none of the measures listed in this Annex

entry restricts enterprises in Costa Rica from otherwise employing

foreign professionals in accordance with Costa Rican law in order

to carry out contracts.

ANNEX I, Schedule of Costa Rica

 

I-CR-9

Sector: Maritime-Land Zone

 

Obligations Concerned: National Treatment (Articles 10.3 and 11.2) 

 Local Presence (Article 11.5)

 Market Access (Article 11.4) 

 

Level of Government: Central

 

Measures: Law No. 6043 of 2 March 1977 – Ley sobre la Zona Marítimo

Terrestre – Arts. 9, 10, 11, and 12, and Chapters 3 and 6

 

Description: Cross-Border Services and Investment

A concession is required to perform any type of development or

activity in the maritime-terrestrial zone.1 Such a concession shall

not be granted to or held by:  (a) foreign nationals that have not

resided in the country for at least five years; (b) enterprises with

bearer shares; (c) enterprises domiciled abroad; (d) enterprises

incorporated in the country solely by foreign nationals; or (e)

enterprises where more than 50 percent of the capital shares or

stocks are owned by foreigners.

Within the maritime-terrestrial zone, no concession may be granted

within the first 50 meters counted from the high tide line nor in the

area comprised between the high tide line and the low tide line.

 

                                                

1

 The maritime-terrestrial zone is the 200-meter strip located along the entire length of the Atlantic and Pacific coast

lines of Costa Rica, measured horizontally from the ordinary high tide line.  The maritime-terrestrial zone also

covers all islands located within the Costa Rican territorial waters.

ANNEX I, Schedule of Costa Rica

 

I-CR-10

Sector: Land Transportation Services – Transportation of Passengers

 

Obligations Concerned: National Treatment  (Articles 10.3 and 11.2)

 Most-Favored-Nation Treatment (Articles 10.4 and 11.3)

 Market Access (Article 11.4)

 

Level of Government: Central

 

Measures: Executive Decree No. 26 of 10 November 1965 – Reglamento del

Transporte Internacional de Personas – Arts. 1, 3, 4, 5, 9, 15, and

16 as amended by Executive Decree No. 20785-MOPT of 4

October 1991 – Art. 1 

Law No. 3503 of 10 May 1965 – Ley Reguladora del Transporte

Remunerado de Personas en Vehículos Automotores – Arts. 1, 3, 4,

6, 10, 11, and 25 

Executive Decree No. 31180-MOPT of 24 April 2003 – Regula el

Servicio Público de Transporte Remunerado de Personas en

Modalidad de Taxi – Art. 1

Law No. 7969 of 22 December 1999 – Ley Reguladora del

Servicio Público de Transporte Remunerado de Personas en

Vehículos en la Modalidad de Taxis – Arts. 1, 2, 3, 29, 30, and 33 

Executive Decree No. 5743-T of 12 February 1976 – Reglamento a

la Ley Reguladora del Transporte Remunerado de Personas en

Vehículos Taxis – Arts. 1, 2, 5, and 14 

Executive Decree No. 28913-MOPT of 13 September 2000 –

Reglamento del Primer Procedimiento Especial Abreviado para el

Transporte Remunerado de Personas en Vehículos en la

Modalidad de Taxi – Arts. 1, 3, and 16 

Law No. 5066 of 30 August 1972 – Ley General de Ferrocarriles

– Arts. 1, 4, 5, and 41

Executive Decree No. 28337-MOPT of 16 December 1999 –

Reglamento sobre Políticas y Estrategias para la Modernización

del Transporte Colectivo Remunerado de Personas por Autobuses

Urbanos para el Área Metropolitana de San José y Zonas

Aledañas que la Afecta Directa o Indirectamente – Art. 1 

 

ANNEX I, Schedule of Costa Rica

 

I-CR-11

Executive Decree No 15203-MOPT of 22 February 1984

Reglamento para la Explotación de Servicios Especiales de

Transporte Automotor Remunerado de Personas – Arts. 2, 3, 4,

and 5 

Law No. 7593 of 9 August 1996 – Ley de la Autoridad Reguladora

de los Servicios Públicos – Arts. 5, 9, 10, and 13

 

Description: Cross-Border Services and Investment

 

Costa Rica reserves the right to limit the number of concessions to

operate domestic remunerated passenger transportation routes in

automotive vehicles (including special passenger transportation

services as defined in Articles 2 and 3 of Executive Decree No.

15203-MOPT of 22 February 1984 – Reglamento para la

Explotación de Servicios Especiales de Transporte Automotor

Remunerado de Personas).  Such concessions shall be awarded

through bidding, which shall only be opened if the Ministerio de

Obras Públicas y Transportes has previously determined the need

to supply the service according to the proper technical studies.

Where there are multiple bids, including one by a Costa Rican

supplier, that satisfy the requirements to the same extent, the Costa

Rican bid shall be preferred over the foreign bid, whether by

natural persons or enterprises. 

A permit to operate an international remunerated passenger

transportation service shall be granted only to enterprises

organized under Costa Rican law or those that are at least 60

percent owned by Central American nationals. 

In addition to the restriction set out above, when granting permits

to supply international services for remunerated passenger

transportation, the principle of reciprocity shall apply.

A permit is required in order to supply international remunerated

passenger land transportation services.  New concessions may be

granted if justified by demand for the service.  Priority will be

given to concessionaires already supplying the service.

Costa Rica reserves the right to limit the number of permits or

concessions to supply domestic remunerated passenger land

transportation services based on demand for the service.  Priority

will be given to concessionaires already supplying the service.

ANNEX I, Schedule of Costa Rica

 

I-CR-12

The Ministerio de Obras Públicas y Transportes reserves the right

to set annual limits on the number of concessions for taxi cab

services to be granted in each district, county (cantón), and

province.  Only one taxi cab concession may be granted to each

natural person, and each concession grants the right to operate only

one vehicle.  Bids for taxi concesions are awarded based on a point

system that gives an advantage to existing suppliers.

Each concession to supply regular public remunerated passenger

transportation services in automotive vehicles, excluding taxi cabs,

may be granted only to one person, unless an economic needs test

evidences the need to have additional suppliers.  In addition, one

natural person may not own more than two enterprises nor be a

majority shareholder in more than three enterprises operating

different routes. 

Permission to supply non-tour bus passenger transportation

services in the greater metropolitan area of the Central Valley of

Costa Rica shall only be granted once it has been demonstrated

that regular public bus services cannot satisfy the demand.  

 

 Costa Rica reserves the right to maintain a monopoly over the

supply of railroad transportation.  However the State can grant

concessions to private persons.  Concessions may be granted if

justified by demand for the service.  Priority will be given to

concessionaires already supplying the service.

ANNEX I, Schedule of Costa Rica

 

I-CR-13

Sector: Land Transportation Services – Freight Transportation

 

Obligations Concerned: National Treatment (Articles 10.3 and 11.2) 

 Most-Favored-Nation Treatment (Articles 10.4 and 11.3)

 Senior Management and Boards of Directors (Article 10.10)

 Market Access (Article 11.4)

 

Level of Government: Central

 

Measures: Executive Decree No. 31363 of 02 June 2003 – Reglamento de

Circulación por Carretera con base en el Peso y las Dimensiones

de los Vehículos de Carga – Art. 69 

Executive Decree No. 15624-MOPT of 28 August 1984 –

Reglamento del Transporte Automotor de Carga Local – Arts. 8, 9,

10, and 12 

Law No. 7593 of 9 August 1996 – Ley de la Autoridad Reguladora

de los Servicios Públicos – Arts. 5, 9, and 13

 

Description: Cross-Border Services and Investment

 

Only Costa Rican nationals or enterprises may supply motorized

transportation services between two points within the territory of

Costa Rica.  Such an enterprise must meet the following

requirements:  (a) at least 51 percent of its capital must be owned

by Costa Rican nationals; and (b) Costa Rican nationals must have

effective control and management of the enterprise.

 

No motor vehicle, trailer, or tractor-trailer with foreign license

plates may transport goods within the territory of Costa Rica.  This

prohibition does not apply to vehicles, trailers, or tractor-trailers

registered in one of the Central American countries.  

 

Foreign enterprises involved in international multi-modal freight

transportation must contract enterprises organized under the laws

of Costa Rica to transport containers and tractor-trailers within

Costa Rica.

 

 Costa Rica reserves the right to grant concessions to supply

railroad freight transportation services based on demand for the

service.  Priority will be given to concessionaires already

supplying the service.

ANNEX I, Schedule of Costa Rica

 

I-CR-14

Sector: Water Transportation Services  

 

Obligations Concerned: National Treatment (Articles 10.3 and 11.2)

 Market Access (Article 11.4)

 Local Presence (Article 11.5) 

 

Level of Government: Central

 

Measures: Law No. 7593 of 9 August 1996 – Ley de la Autoridad Reguladora

de los Servicios Públicos – Arts. 5, 9, and 13

 

 Law No. 104 of 06 June 1853 – Código de Comercio de 1853-

Libro III Del Comercio Marítimo – Arts. 537 and 580

Law No. 12 of 22 October 1941 – Ley de Abanderamiento de

Barcos – Arts. 41 and 43 

Law No. 2220 of 20 June 1958 – Ley de Servicio de Cabotaje de la

República – Arts. 5, 7, 8, 9, 11, and 12

Executive Decree No. 66 of 4 November 1960 – Reglamento de la

Ley de Servicios de Cabotaje de la República – Arts. 10, 11, 12,

15, and 16

Executive Decree No. 12568-T-S-H of 30 April 1981 –

Reglamento del Registro Naval Costarricense – Arts. 8, 10, 11, 12,

and 13

Executive Decree No. 23178-J-MOPT of 18 April 1994 – Traslada

Registro Nacional Buques al Registro Público Propiedad Mueble

Art. 5

 

Description: Cross-Border Services and Investment

Costa Rica reserves the right to limit the number of concessions to

water transportation services based on demand for those services. 

Priority will be given to concessionaires already supplying the

service.

A concession to supply cabotage services shall only be granted to

Costa Rican nationals or enterprises organized under Costa Rican

law of which at least 60 percent of the shares are owned by Costa

Rican nationals. 

 

ANNEX I, Schedule of Costa Rica

 

I-CR-15

Only Costa Rican nationals, national public entities, enterprises

constituted and domiciled in Costa Rica, and shipping company

representatives can register vessels in Costa Rica.  This rule may

not apply to foreign nationals or foreign enterprises registering

vessels smaller than 50 tons for non-commercial use only.  

 

All natural persons or enterprises established abroad that own one

or more foreign registered vessels located in Costa Rica shall

appoint and maintain an agent or legal representative in Costa Rica

to act as liaison with the official authorities in all vessel-related

matters.

 

Trade and tourist cabotage activities between Costa Rican ports

must be conducted by vessels registered in Costa Rica. 

 

Foreign nationals who wish to act as captain of a vessel with Costa

Rican registry and flag must post a bond equivalent to at least half

of the value of the vessel under his/her command.

 

 At least ten percent of the crew on Costa Rican registered vessels

used for international traffic that call on Costa Rican ports shall be

Costa Rican nationals, provided that such trained personnel are

available domestically. 

ANNEX I, Schedule of Costa Rica

 

I-CR-16

Sector: Specialty Air Services  

 

Obligations Concerned: National Treatment (Article 11.2) 

 Most-Favored-Nation Treatment  (Article 11.3)

 Local Presence (Article 11.5)

  

  

Level of Government: Central

 

Measures: Law No. 5150 of 14 May 1973 – Ley General de Aviación Civil

Arts. 143, 156, paragraphs 3 and 4, and 179 

Executive Decree No. 3326-T of 25 October 1973 – Reglamento

para el Otorgamiento de Certificados de Explotación – Arts. 5 and

6

Executive Decree No. 4440-T of 3 January 1975 – Reglamento

para la Operación del Registro Aeronáutico Costarricense – Art.

20 and 38

Executive Decree No. 4637- T of 18 February 1975 – Reglamento

de Licencias para Personal Técnico Aeronáutico – Art. 23

Executive Decree No. 31520-MS-MAG-MINAE-MOPT-MGPSP

of 16  October 2003 – Reglamento para las Actividades de

Aviación Agrícola – Arts. 10, 11, 13, 24, and 41

Executive Decree No. 28262-MOPT of 1 November 1999 –

Reglamento de Certificados de Operador Aéreo (COA),

Certificados Operativos y Autorizaciones de Operación (RAC 119)

– Sections 119.33 and 119.47

 

Description: Cross-Border Services  

Costa Rican enterprises interested in obtaining a provider

certificate for any aeronautical service, including specialty air

services, must demonstrate that effective control and management

of the enterprise, and at least 51 percent of the capital, are in the

hands of Costa Rican nationals.

Certificates for the supply of any aeronautical service shall be

issued to enterprises constituted under foreign law, based on the

principle of reciprocity.

 

ANNEX I, Schedule of Costa Rica

 

I-CR-17

Every holder of a provider certificate must maintain an operation

and maintenance base in Costa Rica.

 

 

ANNEX I, Schedule of Costa Rica

 

I-CR-18

Sector: Air Transportation Services 

 

Obligations Concerned: National Treatment (Article 10.3) 

 Most-Favored-Nation Treatment (Article 10.4)

 Senior Management and Boards of Directors (Article 10.10)

 

Level of Government: Central

 

Measures: Law No. 5150 of 14 May 1973 – Ley General de Aviación Civil

Arts. 36, 37, 42, 149, 156, and 179

Executive Decree No. 3326-T of 25 October 1973  Reglamento

para el Otorgamiento de Certificados de Explotación – Arts. 5 and

6

Executive Decree No. 4440-T of 3 January 1975 – Reglamento

para la Operación del Registro Aeronáutico Costarricense – Arts.

20 and 38

Executive Decree No. 4637-T of 18 February 1975 – Reglamento

de Licencias para Personal Técnico Aeronáutico – Art. 23

 

Description: Investment

Only Costa Rican nationals or enterprises may supply domestic air

transport services, whether regular or non-regular. 

In order to supply these services, the Costa Rican enterprise must

meet the following requirements: (a) at least 51 percent of its

capital must be owned by Costa Rican nationals; and (b) effective

control and management of the enterprise must be in the hands of

Costa Rican nationals.  Foreign nationals cannot be members of

the Board of Directors of such enterprises.

Only Costa Rican nationals or enterprises may register aircraft in

the Registro Aeronáutico Costarricense to be used for remunerated

airborne activities. 

Foreign nationals that legally reside in the country may also

register aircraft used exclusively for non-commercial purposes. 

In the absence of agreements or conventions, certificates for the

supply of international air transportation shall be issued based on

the principle of reciprocity. 

ANNEX I, Schedule of Costa Rica

 

I-CR-19

Sector: Tourist Guides

 

Obligations Concerned: National Treatment (Article 11.2)

 

Level of Government: Central

 

Measures: Executive Decree No. 31030-MEIC-TUR of 17 January 2003 –

Reglamento de los Guías de Turismo – Art. 11

 

Description: Cross-Border Services 

Only Costa Rican nationals may apply for tour guide licenses. 

 

 

ANNEX I, Schedule of Costa Rica

 

I-CR-20

Sector: Travel Agencies and Tourism

 

Obligations Concerned: Market Access (Article 11.4)

 

Level of Government: Central

 

Measures: Law No. 5339 of 24 August 1973 – Ley Reguladora de las

Agencias de Viajes – Art. 8

Executive Decree No. 24863-H-TUR of 5 December 1995 –

Reglamento de la Ley de Incentivos para el Desarrollo Turístico

Art. 16  

 

Description: Cross-Border Services

Costa Rica reserves the right to limit the number of travel agencies

authorized to operate in Costa Rica based on demand for that

service.

 

ANNEX I, Schedule of Costa Rica

 

I-CR-21

Sector: Transportation Services – Custom Brokers - Assistant Custom

Brokers – Custom Transportation Agents

 

Obligations Concerned: National Treatment (Article 11.2)

 Local Presence (Article 11.5)

 

Level of Government:  Central

 

Measures:  Law No. 7557 of 20 October 1995 – Ley General de Aduanas y sus

reformas – Arts. 28, 29, 33, 35, 40, 41, 44, 46, and 49

Executive Decree No. 25270-H of 14 June 1996 – Reglamento a la

Ley General de Aduanas – Arts. 77, 78, and 113

 

Description: Cross-Border Services

Only persons or enterprises that have a legal representative and

corporate headquarters in Costa Rica may act as a customs

transportation agent, international freight agent, customs

depositary, or other public function customs auxiliary.

Only Costa Rican nationals may act as customs brokers.

ANNEX I, Schedule of Costa Rica

 

I-CR-22

Sector: Telecommunications Related Services – Radio and Television

 

Obligations Concerned: National Treatment (Articles 10.3 and 11.2) 

 Most-Favored-Nation Treatment (Articles 10.4 and 11.3)

 Senior Management and Boards of Directors (Article 10.10)

 Market Access (Article 11.4)

 

Level of Government: Central

 

Measures: Constitución Política de la República de Costa Rica – Art.121

paragraph 14

 

 Law No. 1758 of 19 June 1954 – Ley de Radio y Televisión – Arts.

1, 2, 3, and 7

 

 Executive Decree No. 21 of 29 September 1958 – Reglamento

para la Operación de Radiodifusoras de Televisión – Art. 4

 

Executive Decree No. 63 of 11 December 1956 – Reglamento de

Estaciones Inalámbricas – Arts. 7, 13, 15, and 30 

 

Description: Cross-Border Services and Investment

In Costa Rica, wireless services may not be permanently removed

from State ownership and may be supplied only by the public

administration or by private parties, in accordance with the law or

under a special concession granted for a limited period of time and

on the basis of conditions and stipulations to be established by the

Legislative Assembly. 

Only a Costa Rican national or enterprise with at least 65 percent

of its capital owned by Costa Rican nationals may establish or

manage an enterprise that supplies wireless services.  This

restriction does not apply to the establishment and operation of

ham radio stations, but rights shall not be granted to a foreign

national residing in Costa Rica when the country of origin of the

foreign national does not grant that same right to Costa Rican

nationals. 

Only a Costa Rican national or enterprise that has nominal capital

stock and is owned by Costa Rican nationals may obtain a license

for Ultra High Frequency (UHF) radio broadcasting services.  

Only a Costa Rican national or enterprise with at least 65 percent

of its capital owned by Costa Rican nationals may obtain a license

ANNEX I, Schedule of Costa Rica

 

I-CR-23

or be awarded a free over the air broadcast television channel for

signals that originate in Costa Rica.

Only a Costa Rican national or enterprise with at least 65 percent

of its capital owned by Costa Rican nationals may obtain a license

to operate radio; ham radio; radio-television; and maritime,

aeronautical, meteorological, and private broadcasting stations. 

Directors and administrators of enterprises supplying radio and

television services must be Costa Rican by birth or must have been

naturalized Costa Ricans for at least ten years.  

The right to establish radiographic stations in Costa Rica for

transmission or reception of official messages is permanently

reserved to the State, and is not subject to concession. 

 

ANNEX I, Schedule of Costa Rica

 

I-CR-24

Sector: Wholesale and Retail Distribution – Crude Oil and Its Derivatives

 

Obligations Concerned: Market Access (Article 11.4)

 

Level of Government: Central

 

Measures: Law No. 7356 of 24 August 1993 – Ley del Monopolio Estatal de

Hidrocarburos Administrado por Recope “Establece Monopolio a

favor del Estado para la Importación, Refinación y Distribución de

Petróleo, Combustibles, Asfaltos y Naftas” – Art.1

Law No. 7593 of 9 August 1996 – Ley de la Autoridad Reguladora

de los Servicios Públicos – Arts. 5, 9, and 13

 

Description: Cross-Border Services 

Wholesale distribution of crude oil and its derivatives – including

fuel, asphalt, and naphtha – is subject to a State monopoly.

Costa Rica reserves the right to limit the number of concessions for

retail distributors of crude oil and its derivates – including fuel,

asphalt, and naphtha – based on demand for the service.  Priority

will be given to concessionaires already supplying the service.  

ANNEX I, Schedule of Costa Rica

 

I-CR-25

Sector: Services Incidental to Mining – Hydrocarbon Exploration

 

Obligations Concerned: Local Presence (Article 11.5)

  

Level of Government:  Central

 

Measures: Constitución Política de la República de Costa Rica – Art. 121

Law No. 7399 of 3 May 1994 – Ley de Hidrocarburos – Arts. 1

and 22

Executive Decree No.  24735-MIRENEM of 29 September 1995 –

Reglamento a la Ley de Hidrocarburos – Art. 17

Executive Decree No. 28148-MINAE of 30 August 1999 –

Reglamento de Cesión de Derechos y Obligaciones de Contratos

de Exploración y Explotación de Hidrocarburos – Art. 3

 

Description: Cross-Border Services 

If the recipient of a concession for hydrocarbon exploration and

other services incidental to the mining of hydrocarbons that is

organized under the law of a foreign country, it must have a branch

office and legal representative in Costa Rica. 

 

 

 

ANNEX I, Schedule of Costa Rica

 

I-CR-26

Sector: Mining and Services Incidental to Mining – Ores Other than

Hydrocarbons

 

Obligations Concerned: Market Access (Article 11.4)

 National Treatment (Articles 10.3 and 11.2)   

 Local Presence  (Article 11.5)

 

Level of Government: Central

 

Measures: Constitución Política de la República de Costa Rica – Art. 121,

paragraph 14

 

Law No. 6797 of 4 October 1982 – Código de Minería – Arts. 1, 4,

6, 7, 9, 11, 66, 67, 69, 70, 71, and 74

 

Description: Cross-Border Services and Investment

Exploration and other services incidental to the mining of any

radioactive minerals in Costa Rica may be supplied only by the

State or by private parties under a concession, in accordance with

the Constitution. 

Concessions for mining or exploration of ores other than

hydrocarbons may not be granted to foreign governments or their

representatives.  Concessionaires that are enterprises organized

under foreign law or natural persons not resident in Costa Rica

must appoint a legal representative with full powers of attorney to

acquire rights and enter into obligations on behalf of the

represented natural persons or enterprise, and must also maintain

an office in Costa Rica. 

Banks of the Costa Rican Banking System shall not grant funds in

an amount greater than ten percent of the total investment to

enterprises with more than 50 percent foreign ownership.

Only individuals can constitute mining cooperatives, and 75

percent of the members must be Costa Rican nationals.

ANNEX I, Schedule of Costa Rica

 

I-CR-27

Sector: Scientific and Research Services   

 

Obligations Concerned: Local Presence (Article 11.5)

 

Level of Government: Central

 

Measures: Law No. 7788 of 30 April 1998 – Ley de Biodiversidad – Art. 63

 

Description: Cross-Border Services 

Foreign nationals or enterprises domiciled abroad that supply

scientific research and bioprospecting2 services with regard to

biodiversity3 in Costa Rica shall designate a legal representative

that resides in Costa Rica. 

 

                                                 

2

 Bioprospecting includes the systematic search, classification, and investigation, for commercial purposes, of new

sources of chemical compounds, genes, proteins, microorganisms, and other products with real or potential

economic value found in biodiversity.

3

 Biodiversity includes the variability of live organisms of any source, found in land, air, marine, aquatic, or other

ecological ecosystems, as well as the diversity within each species and between species and the ecosystems of which

they are a part.  Biodiversity also includes intangible elements such as:  the knowledge, innovation, and individual or

collective traditional practice, with real or potential economic value, associated with genetic and bio-chemical

resources protected or not by intellectual property rights or sui generis registry systems.

ANNEX I, Schedule of Costa Rica

 

I-CR-28

Sector: Free Zones

 

Obligations Concerned: Performance Requirements (Article 10.9)

 

Level of Government: Central

 

Measures: Law No. 7210 of 23 November 1990 – Ley de Régimen de Zonas

Francas – Art. 22  

Executive Decree No. 29606-H-COMEX of 18 June 2001 –

Reglamento a la Ley de Régimen de Zonas Francas – Arts. 55 and

57

 

Description: Investment

An enterprise established in the Free Zone in Costa Rica may not

introduce more than 25 percent of its total sales in goods or 50

percent of its total sales in services into Costa Rica’s customs

territory.  An enterprise established in the Free Zone in Costa Rica

that only repackages or redistributes goods but does not alter them

may not introduce any such goods into Costa Rica’s customs

territory. 

 

 

ANNEX I, Schedule of Costa Rica

 

I-CR-29

Sector: Services Incidental to Agriculture and Forestry

 

Obligations Concerned: National Treatment (Article 11.2) 

 

Level of Government: Central

 

Measures: Law No. 7317 of 30 October 1992 – Ley de Conservación de la

Vida Silvestre – Arts. 28, 29, 31, 38, 39, 64, and 66

 

 Executive Decree No. 26435-MINAE of 1 October 1997 –

Reglamento a la Ley de Conservación de la Vida Silvestre – Art.

32

  

Description: Cross-Border Services

A license for scientific or cultural collection of species shall be

issued for a maximum of one year for nationals or residents, and

six months or less for all other foreigners.

Nationals and residents shall pay a lower fee than non-resident

foreigners to obtain the license referred to above.

 

 

ANNEX I, Schedule of Costa Rica

 

I-CR-30

Sector: Fisheries and Services Incidental to Fishing

 

Obligations Concerned: National Treatment (Article 10.3)

 Performance Requirements (Article 10.9)

 

Level of Government: Central

 

Measures: Constitución Política de la República de Costa Rica – Art. 6

 

 Law 190 of 28 September 1948 – Ley de Pesca y Caza Marítimas

Art. 7

Law No. 6267 of 29 August 1978 – Reforma a la Ley de Pesca y

Barcos de Bandera Extranjera en Mar Patrimonial – Arts. 3, 5,

and 14

Executive Decree No. 23943-MOPT-MAG of 5 January 1995 –

Reglamento Regulador del Procedimiento para Otorgar Licencias

de Pesca a Buques Extranjeros que Deseen Ejercer la Actividad de

Pesca en Aguas Jurisdiccionales Costarricenses – Art. 6

Executive Decree No. 12737-A of 23 June 1981 – Reserva con

Exclusividad la Pesca para Fines Comerciales a Costarricenses

Art. 1

Executive Decree No. 17658-MAG of 17 July 1987 – Clasifica

Permisos para Pesca de Camarones en el Litoral Pacífico – Arts.

1, 2, and 3

 

Description: Investment

The State exercises complete and exclusive sovereignty over its

territorial waters within a distance of 12 miles measured from the

low-tide mark along its shores, over its continental shelf, and its

insular undersea base, in accordance with principles of

international law.  It also exercises special jurisdiction over the

seas adjacent to its territory within a distance of two hundred miles

measured from the same mark, in order to protect, preserve, and

exploit exclusively all the natural resources and wealth existing in

the waters, soil, and subsoil of those zones, in accordance with

those principles.

Catch of shrimp and fish with scales may only be allowed in Costa

Rica with vessels built in the country with wood obtained in Costa

Rica and made by Costa Rican nationals.

ANNEX I, Schedule of Costa Rica

 

I-CR-31

Foreign flag fishing vessels may pay lower fees and benefit from

automatic renewal of fishing permits if they supply their catch to

national enterprises.  National enterprises are those with at least 51

percent of their capital belonging to Costa Rican nationals.  

Commercial fishing within the 12 miles of Costa Rican territorial

waters is exclusively reserved to Costa Rican nationals and Costa

Rican enterprises with at least 51 percent of their capital belonging

to Costa Rican nationals that fish with vessels flying the Costa

Rican flag.   

The commercial catch of shrimp in Costa Rican territorial waters

of the Pacific Ocean is reserved to vessels with Costa Rican

registry and flag owned by Costa Rican nationals.  

 

 

 

 

 

ANNEX I, Schedule of Costa Rica

 

I-CR-32

Sector: Electric Energy

 

Obligations Concerned: Market Access (Article 11.4)

 Local Presence (Article 11.5) 

 National Treatment (Articles 10.3 and 11.2)

 

Level of Government: Central

 

Measures: Constitución Política de la República de Costa Rica – Art. 121

Law No. 7200 of 28 April 1990 – Ley que Autoriza la Generación

Eléctrica Autónoma o Paralela – Arts. 1, 2, 3, 5, 7, and 26 as

amended by Law No. 7508 of  09 May 1995 – Ley sobre Reforma

a la Ley que Autoriza la Generación Autónoma o Paralela – Arts.

2 and 3

Law No. 7789 of 30 April 1998 – Transformación de la Empresa

de Servicios Públicos de Heredia – Art. 15

Executive Decree No. 20346 MIRENEM of 21 March 1991

Reglamento a la Ley que Autoriza la Generación Eléctrica

Autónoma o Paralela – Arts. 4, 5, 6, and 8 

Executive Decree No. 24866-MINAE of 12 December 1995 –

Reglamento al Capítulo II de la Ley de Generación Paralela: 

Régimen de Competencia – Art. 34

Law No. 7593 of 9 August 1996 – Ley de la Autoridad Reguladora

de los Servicios Públicos – Arts. 5, 9, and 13

Law No. 8345 of 20 February 2003 – Ley de Participación de las

Cooperativas de Electrificación Rural y de las Empresas de

Servicios Públicos Municipales en el Desarrollo Nacional – Arts.

1, 2, 3, 6, 7, 9, 11, 12, and 13

 

Description: Cross-Border Services and Investment

Costa Rica reserves the right to grant concessions for the

transmission, distribution, and trade of electric energy by

legislation based on demand for the service.  Priority will be given

to concessionaires already supplying the service.

For greater certainty, some of the enterprises that currently have

concessions to supply these services include:  Instituto

Costarricense de Electricidad (ICE); Empresa de Servicios

Públicos de Heredia; Junta Administrativa del Servicio Eléctrico

ANNEX I, Schedule of Costa Rica

 

I-CR-33

Municipal de Cartago (JASEC); Compañía Nacional de Fuerza y

Luz; and cooperative associations, cooperative consortiums, and

public municipal service enterprises in accordance with the

provisions of Law No. 8345.  

All of these enterprises may enter into joint ventures with public or

private enterprises to supply their services, subject to the

provisions stipulated by law.  In the case of Empresa de Servicios

Públicos de Heredia, no less than 51 percent of the capital of the

private enterprise may be owned by Costa Rican nationals.

Private persons may invest in activities for the operation of limited

capacity power plants4 not exceeding 20,000 kW, provided they

meet the following requirements: 

(a)  ICE may purchase electricity from enterprises in which no

less than 35 percent of the capital is owned by Costa Rican

nationals. 

(b)  Enterprises organized under foreign law that sign a power

purchase contract with ICE must establish a branch office in

Costa Rica.

                                                

4

 For greater certainty, ICE may authorize the operation of a limited capacity plant, provided that the power

generated by all such private plants in Costa Rica does not represent more than 15 percent of the total power

produced by all public and private plants in the national electric system.  Also for greater certainty, any power

generated using water in the public domain may be provided only by the State or by private parties, under a

concession, in accordance with the Constitution. 

ANNEX I, Schedule of Costa Rica

 

I-CR-34

 

Sector: Higher Education Services  

 

Obligations Concerned: National Treatment (Articles 10.3 and 11.2)

 Senior Management and Boards of Directors (Article 10.10)

 

Level of Government: Central

 

Measures: Executive Decree No. 30431 of 23 April 2002 – Reglamento de la

Educación Superior Parauniversitaria – Arts. 6 and 61, paragraph

(d)

 

Description: Cross-Border Services and Investment

No less than 85 percent of the faculty, administrative faculty, and

administrative staff of a private institute of higher education must

be Costa Rican nationals. 

 

ANNEX I, Schedule of Costa Rica

 

I-CR-35

Sector:  Human Health Service Professionals – Physicians and Surgeons,

Dental Surgeons, Microbiologists, Pharmacists, Nurses, and

Nutritionists

 

Obligations Concerned: National Treatment (Article 11.2)  

 

Level of Government: Central 

 

Measures: Law No. 7559 of 9 November 1995 – Ley de Servicio Social

Obligatorio para los Profesionales en las Ciencias de la Salud 

Arts. 2, 3, 5, 6, and 7

 

 Executive Decree No. 25068 of 21 March 1996 – Reglamento de

Servicio Social Obligatorio para los Profesionales en Ciencias de

la Salud – Arts.7, 13, 14, 17, 18, 21, and 22

 

Executive Decree No. 25841-S of 5 February 1997 – Reforma al

Reglamento de Servicio Social Obligatorio para los Profesionales

en Ciencias de la Salud – Art. 1

 

Description: Cross-Border Services

 

All Physicians and Surgeons, Dental Surgeons, Microbiologists,

Pharmacists, Nurses, and Nutritionists must perform the equivalent

of a one-year continuous, remunerated mandatory social services

requirement.

The assignment of the slots to perform mandatory social services is

made through a drawing.  If there are enough slots to perform

mandatory social services for all applicants, applicants who are

Costa Rican nationals are given priority over applicants who are

foreign nationals with respect to assignment of the specific slots. 

 

If the number of slots offered in the drawing is less than the

number of applicants, applicants who are Costa Rican nationals

shall have the priority to freely choose if they want to participate or

not in the drawing.  Such choice shall be respected as long as the

number of applicants who do not wish to choose a slot is equal to

or less than the number of shortage of slots.  When the number of

applicants who are Costa Rican nationals that do not wish to

participate in the drawing exceeds the number of shortage of slots,

a lottery shall be made among them to determine who shall

participate in the drawing of slots.

 

ANNEX I, Schedule of Costa Rica

 

I-CR-36

If there is still a shortage of slots when the applicants who are

Costa Rican nationals have already made their choice, the same

procedure shall be applied for the drawing of slots among

applicants who are foreign nationals.

Subject to the conditions and terms included in the legislation and

regulations applicable to each professional category listed above,

the mandatory social service requirement may be waived for

temporary professional practice.  

 

 

 

ANNEX I, Schedule of Costa Rica

 

I-CR-37

Sector: Audiovisuals – AdvertisingServices of Cinema, Radio,

Television, and Other Shows 

 

Obligations Concerned: Performance Requirements (Article 10.9)

 Local Presence (Article 11.5)

 National Treatment (Articles 10.3 and 11.2)  

 Most-Favored-Nation Treatment (Articles 10.4 and 11.3) 

 Market Access (Article 11.4)

 

Level of Government: Central

 

Measures: Law No. 6220 of 20 April 1978 – Regula Medios de Difusión y

Agencias de Publicidad – Art. 3

 

Law No. 1758 of 19 June 1954 – Ley de Radio y Televisión – Art.

11

 

Executive Decree No. 12764-G of 22 June 1981 – Reglamenta Ley

de Publicidad – Arts. 1 and 5

 

Description: Cross-Border Services and Investment

 

Mass media and advertising services may only be provided by

entrerprises incorporated in Costa Rica with nominative stock or

established as “sociedades personales” under Costa Rican law.

Radio and television programs must observe the following rules: 

If the commercials consist of jingles recorded abroad, a lump

sum must be paid every time the commercial is aired on

domestically transmitted television.  Only 30 percent of the

commercials aired on each domestic television station or

projected in each cinema may originate from abroad. 

Commercials imported in a physical medium from outside the

Central American region and aired on domestically transmitted

television must pay a tax equivalent to 100 percent of the

declared value of the production of the commercial.  Radio,

movie, or television commercials are considered national when

they are produced in any of the Central American countries

with which there is reciprocity in the matter.

The number of radio programs and radio soap operas recorded

abroad may not exceed 50 percent of the total number aired per

domestically transmitted radio station per day.

ANNEX I, Schedule of Costa Rica

 

I-CR-38

The number of programs filmed or videotaped abroad may be

limited to 60 percent of the total number of programs aired on

domestically transmitted television per day.

Radio, movie, or television commercials are considered national

when at least 90 percent of the jingle has been composed or

arranged by Costa Rican nationals, at least 90 percent of the image

has been drawn, photographed, printed, filmed, or videotaped by

Costa Rican nationals, and when at least 90 percent of the technical

personnel participating in the overall production are Costa Rican

nationals. 

ANNEX I, Schedule of Costa Rica

 

I-CR-39

Sector: News Agency Services 

 

Obligations Concerned: National Treatment (Article 11.2) 

 Local Presence (Article 11.5)

 

Level of Government: Central

 

Measures: Executive Decree No. 14931-C of 20 October 1983 – Reforma

Reglamento Ley Orgánica Colegio Periodistas – Arts. 6 and 26

 

 Executive Decree No. 15294-C of 27 February 1984

 

Description: Cross-Border Services

Except as authorized, a journalist who is a foreign national may

cover events in Costa Rica only if he or she is a resident of Costa

Rica. 

The Board of Directors of the Colegio de Periodistas may grant

non-resident foreign nationals a special permit to cover events in

Costa Rica for up to one year and may extend that period, provided

that doing so does not harm or conflict with the interests of

members of the Colegio de Periodistas. 

If the Colegio de Periodistas decides that an event of international

importance will or has occurred in Costa Rica, the Colegio de

Periodistas may grant a non-resident foreign national with

appropriate professional credentials a temporary permit to cover

the event for the foreign media the journalist represents.  Such

permit may be valid for up to one month after the event.

 

ANNEX I, Schedule of Costa Rica

 

I-CR-40

Sector: Sports Services and Other Entertainment Services  

 

Obligations Concerned: Market Access (Article 11.4)

 National Treatment (Articles 10.3 and 11.2)  

 Local Presence (Article 11.5) 

 

Level of Government: Central

 

Measures: Law No. 7744 of 19 December 1997 – Ley de Concesión y

Operación de Marinas Turísticas – Arts. 1, 12, and 21

Executive Decree No. 27030-TUR-MINAE-MOPT of 20 May

1998 – Reglamento a la Ley de Concesión y Funcionamiento de

Marinas Turísticas – Art. 52

 

Description: Cross-Border Services and Investment

To obtain concessions to develop tourism marinas or docking

facilities, enterprises with their principal place of business abroad

must be established in Costa Rica.

Foreign nationals shall appoint a representative with sufficient

legal authority and with permanent residence in Costa Rica. 

All foreign flag vessels using marina services may remain in the

Costa Rican exclusive economic zone for a maximum period of

two years, extendable for like periods.  While in Costa Rica,

foreign flag vessels and their crew cannot supply water

transportation services or fishing, diving, or other sports or

tourism-related activities, except tourism cruises.  

 

ANNEX I, Schedule of Costa Rica

 

I-CR-41

Sector: Railroads, Ports, and Airports 

 

Obligations Concerned: Market Access (Article 11.4)

 Local Presence (Article 11.5)

 

Level of Government: Central

 

Measures: Constitución Política de la República de Costa Rica – Art.121,

paragraph 14 

 

 Law No. 7762 of 14 April 1998 – Ley General de Concesión de

Obras Públicas con Servicios Públicos – Arts. 2, 3, 4, 5, and 31 

 

Description: Cross-Border Services 

National railroads, docks, and airports – the latter while in use –

may not be sold, leased or encumbered, directly or indirectly, or be

otherwise removed from State ownership and control.

The Executive Branch may grant concessions for railroads,

railways, docks, and international airports.  In the case of Limon,

Moin, Caldera, and Puntarenas docks, concessions may only be

granted for future works or expansions.

All enterprises holding railroad, port or airport concession must be

organized under Costa Rican law and domiciled in Costa Rica. 

ANNEX I, Schedule of Costa Rica

 

I-CR-42

Sector: Wireless Services 

 

Obligations Concerned: Market Access (Article 11.4)

 National Treatment (Articles 10.3 and 11.2)

 Most-Favored-Nation Treatment (Articles 10.4 and 11.3)

 

Level of Government: Central

 

Measures: Constitución Política de la República de Costa Rica – Art. 121,

paragraph 14

Law No. 1758 of 19 June 1954 – Ley de Radio y Televisión – Arts.

1, 2, 3, and 25

 

Description: Cross Border Services and Investment 

In Costa Rica, wireless services may not be permanently removed

from State ownership and may be supplied only by the public

administration or by private parties, in accordance with the law or

under a special concession granted for a limited period of time and

on the basis of conditions and stipulations to be established by the

Legislative Assembly.

The right to establish radiographic stations in Costa Rica for

transmission or reception of official messages, is permanently

reserved to the State, and is not subject to concession. 

Only a Costa Rican national or enterprise with at least 65 percent

of its capital owned by Costa Rican nationals may establish or

manage an enterprise that supplies wireless services.  This

restriction does not apply to the establishment and operation of

ham radio stations, but rights shall not be granted to a foreign

national residing in Costa Rica when the country of origin of the

foreign national does not grant that same right to Costa Rican

nationals.

Notwithstanding the measures listed above, including any

requirements regarding ownership of capital by Costa Rican

nationals, Costa Rica shall allow telecommunications services

providers of another Party, on a non-discriminatory basis, to

effectively compete to supply directly to the customer, through the

ANNEX I, Schedule of Costa Rica

 

I-CR-43

technology of their choice, the following telecommunications

services in its territory:5

 

 

(i) private network services,6 no later than January 1, 2006; 

(ii) Internet services,7 no later than January 1, 2006; and

(iii) mobile wireless services,8 no later than January 1, 2007. 

                                                

5

 If Costa Rica requires a license for the provision of a listed service, Costa Rica shall make licenses available within

the timeframes specified in this subparagraph.

6

  Private network services (closed-user group services) mean networks provided for communications with no

interconnection to the public switched telecommunications network at either end.  Nothing in this Annex shall be

construed to prevent Costa Rica from prohibiting persons operating private networks from using their networks to

supply public telecommunications networks or services to third parties.

7

  Internet services shall include electronic mail; retrieval and processing on-line information and databases and

electronic data exchange services, and offering the ability to access the Internet.

8

  Mobile wireless services mean voice, data, and/or broadband services provided by radio electric means in

specifically allocated bands, using mobile or fixed terminal equipment, using cellular, PCS (Personal

Communications Service), satellite, or any other similar technology that may be developed in the future for these

services.

ANNEX I, Schedule of Costa Rica

 

I-CR-44

Sector:   On Premise Supply of Liquors for Consumption  

Obligations Concerned: Market Access (Article 11.4)

 

Level of Government: Central

 

Measures: Law No. 10 of  7 October 1936 – Ley sobre la Venta de Licores

Arts. 8, 11, and 16  

    

Description: Cross-Border Services

Municipalities decide the number of establishments selling liquor

that can be authorized in each one of the areas under their

jurisdiction.  In no case can this number exceed the following

proportion:

(a) in province capitals, one establishment selling foreign

liquor and one establishment selling domestic liquor per

three hundred residents;

(b) in all other cities with over one thousand inhabitants, one

establishment selling foreign liquor per five hundred

residents and one establishment selling domestic liquor per

three hundred residents; 

(c) cities under one thousand residents but over five hundred

residents may have two establishments selling foreign

liquor and two selling domestic liquor; and

(d) any other cities with five hundred residents or less may

have one establishment selling foreign liquor and one

establishment selling domestic liquor.  

No establishment for on-premise supply of liquors for consumption

will be allowed outside the perimeter of cities or where no

permanent police authority exists. 

In a public auction, no person may receive authorization for more

than one establishment selling foreign liquor and one establishment

selling domestic liquor in the same city. 

 

ANNEX I, Schedule of Costa Rica

 

I-CR-45

Sector: Lottery Sale Services

 

Obligations Concerned: Market Access (Article 11.4)

 

Level of Government: Central

 

Measures: Law No. 7395 of 3 May 1994 – Ley de Loterías – Art. 2

Law No. 1387 of 21 November 1951 – Ley de Rifas y Loterías

Art. 1

 

Description: Cross-Border Services

The Junta de Protección Social de San José shall be the sole

manager and distributor of lottery, except for the “Juego Crea”. 

All lottery, “tiempos”, raffles, and clubs that award prizes

consisting of payments in cash are prohibited, except for the

Juego Crea” and those issued by the Junta de Protección Social

de San José.

 

Dominican Republic Schedule

Schedule of the Dominican Republic

 

Sector: All Sectors

 

Obligations Concerned: National Treatment (Article 10.3)

 

Measures: - Ley sobre Inversión Extranjera, No. 16-95, November 20, 1995,

Art. 5

 - Ley General sobre Medio Ambiente y Recursos Naturales, No.

64-00, August 18, 2000, Art. 101

 

    

Description: Investment

 

Only Dominican nationals may perform activities related to the

disposal of toxic, hazardous, or dangerous or radioactive waste

produced outside the Dominican Republic.

 

ANNEX I, Schedule of the Dominican Republic

 

I-DR-2

 

Sector: Professional ServicesLegal Services

 

Obligations Concerned: National Treatment (Article 11.2)

 Market Access (Article 11.4)

 

Measures: - Ley del Notariado, No. 301, June 18, 1964, Arts. 4, 5, and 10

 - Ley de Organización Judicial, y sus modificaciones, No. 821,

November 21, 1927, Chapter XI, Art. 73

 - Ley que crea el Colegio de Abogados, No. 91, February 3, 1983,

Art. 4

 

Description: Cross-Border Services

 

To practice law before the courts in the Dominican Republic or to

render public notary services a lawyer must be a Dominican

national and a member of the Colegio de Abogados.

A foreign lawyer may render legal services other than those related

to the judicial function or appearing in court provided the foreign

lawyer is a member of the Colegio de Abogados.

A foreign lawyer who is not a member of the Colegio de Abogados

may supply foreign legal consulting services provided that the

foreign lawyer is licensed to practice law in a jurisdiction that

permits Dominican nationals to supply foreign legal consulting

services.  The Dominican Republic shall permit foreign lawyers

who are supplying foreign legal consulting services from the

territory of a Party into the territory of the Dominican Republic in

the period preceding the date of signature of this Agreement to

continue supplying such services.

The authorization of new notaries public is subject to quotas,

proportional to the number of inhabitants in each municipality and

the national district.

ANNEX I, Schedule of the Dominican Republic

 

I-DR-3

 

A foreign lawyer may become a member of the Colegio de

Abogados: 

(a) by obtaining a law degree in the Dominican Republic;

(b) by obtaining revalidation of a law degree issued in a

foreign country; or

(c) if the government of a jurisdiction in which the foreign

national has a license to practice law has an agreement with

the Dominican Republic establishing reciprocal treatment

for Dominican lawyers.

For purposes of this entry:

(a) lawyer means in general all persons who, in the exercise of

a function and by reason of special knowledge regarding

the law, render legal advice, and includes professors and

researchers working in universities, all the judges of the

Dominican Republic, court-appointed lawyers (abogados

de oficio), public prosecutors, public notaries, legal

advisors and consultants to natural or corporate persons,

public or private; and

(b) foreign legal consulting service means providing advice

by a lawyer regarding matters with respect to which the

lawyer or law firm is authorized to render legal services in

his, her, or its home market.

ANNEX I, Schedule of the Dominican Republic

 

I-DR-4

 

Sector: Professional Services    Architectural and Engineering Services 

 

Obligations Concerned: National Treatment (Article 11.2)

 Most-Favored-Nation Treatment (Article 11.3)

 Local Presence (Article 11.5)

 

Measures: - Ley sobre el Ejercicio de Ingeniería, la Arquitectura, la

Agrimensura y Profesiones Afines, No. 6200, February 22, 1962,

Arts. 17, 18, and 19

 - Decreto que Reglamenta el Ejercicio Rrofesional del Ingeniero

Químico, No.511-86, June 26, 1986, Arts. 8, 9, and 10

 - Ley sobre la Promoción del Desarrollo Turístico en Destinos

Subdesarrollados y en Nuevos Destinos en Provincias y

Localidades con Potencial Extraordinario, que Crea el Fondo

Oficial para la Promoción del Turismo, No. 158-01, October 9,

2001, Art. 14

 

Description:   Cross-Border Services

 

Only members of the Colegio Dominicano de Ingenieros,

Arquitectos y Agrimensores de la Republica Dominicana

(“CODIA”) may practice as engineers, architects, and land

surveyors.  A foreign professional who meets the relevant

qualifications may join CODIA as long as Dominican nationals are

not prohibited from practicing in the jurisdiction in which the

foreign professional is licensed.

However, professionals who graduated from foreign universities

who are not members of CODIA may practice in the Dominican

Republic when:

(a) the Executive Branch, in special and justified cases,

contracts their services to perform specialized jobs or

technical consulting in those fields of the profession in

which such services are necessary; or

(b) an enterprise or institution contracts the professional to

supply a specific service for a specified time and

sufficiently demonstrates the necessity for this to CODIA,

which will then authorize the professional to supply the

service. 

A Dominican chemical engineer must review the plans for and

installation of any production facility constructed in the Dominican

Republic by foreign technicians or enterprises.  In addition, if

ANNEX I, Schedule of the Dominican Republic

 

I-DR-5

 

foreign technicians whose activities are related to the chemical

engineering field are used in the installation or start up of a

production facility, at least one Dominican chemical engineer must

have a role in their supervision.

After the installation and start-up of a production facility, the

facility may not employ foreign technicians related to the field of

chemical engineering if Dominican engineers with the relevant

expertise are available.  If no qualified Dominican engineer is

available, an enterprise may employ foreign technicians, but only

as long as their number is proportionate to the number of

Dominican technicians.1  However, this requirement does not

apply to enterprises that employ at least one Dominican engineer.

To provide architectural and engineering services related to

construction, persons who are not members of CODIA must

associate with a CODIA member.

A Dominican professional must prepare any projects and

preliminary plans that are submitted to qualify for benefits from

the Fondo Oficial de Promoción Turística. 

Foreign nationals and enterprises organized under foreign law must

associate with an enterprise organized under Dominican law in

order to provide services related to urban and architectural studies

for a tourism-related project. 

                                                

1

 In practice, an enterprise may meet this requirement at any time by employing three Dominican technicians for

every seven foreign technicians.

ANNEX I, Schedule of the Dominican Republic

 

I-DR-6

 

Sector: Professional Services

 Accounting, Auditing, and Bookkeeping Services.

 

Obligations Concerned: National Treatment (Article 11.2)

 Local Presence (Article 11.5)

 Market Access (Article 11.4)

 

Measures: - Decreto que aprueba el Reglamento Interno del Instituto de

Contadores Públicos Autorizados de la República Dominicana,

No. 2032, June 1, 1984, Art. 6

 - Código de Ética Profesional del Instituto de Contadores Públicos

Autorizados de la República Dominicana (ICPARD), October 9,

2001, Art. 3.2.13

 

Description: Cross-Border Services 

 

Only Dominican nationals may practice as Certified Public

Accountants in the Dominican Republic.  Foreign public

accountants, auditors, or bookkeepers, as individuals or

enterprises, may practice their profession only in association with a

Dominican accountant.

 

ANNEX I, Schedule of the Dominican Republic

 

I-DR-7

 

Sector:   Professional Services  Health Services and Related Professions

 

Obligations Concerned: National Treatment (Article 11.2)

Most-Favored-Nation Treatment (Article 11.3)

    Local Presence (Article 11.5)

 

Measures: - Ley General de Salud, No.42-01, March 8, 2001, Arts. 92 and 93

 - Ley que crea el Colegio Dominicano de Psicólogos/as, No. 22-

01, February 1, 2001, Art. 4-c

 - Ley  que Establece un Impuesto sobre los Honorarios Cobrados

por Médicos Extranjeros que Ejerzan en la República Dominicana,

No. 3491, March 6, 1953, Art. 12

 

Description:   Cross-Border Services

 

Foreign nationals graduated from foreign universities may practice

health-related professions in the Dominican Republic provided

that:

(a) there is an agreement between governments allowing

professionals to practice in both countries; 

(b) the service is not offered or is insufficient in the Dominican

Republic; and

(c) the foreigner has the degree certified for equivalency and

obtains an exequátur from the Executive Branch.

However, health professionals authorized by the Secretaría de

Estado de Salud Pública y Asistencia Social (SESPAS) may

practice their profession provided they are visiting the country to

render public health services on a non-profit basis.

Other health professionals may practice medicine or surgery on a

temporary basis if requested or contracted by a clinic or hospital of

the Dominican Republic and authorized by SESPAS and by the

Asociación Médica Dominicana.  For greater certainty, such

temporary practice may include training, demonstration, lecturing,

or research through a health-related facility, including a university

or laboratory.  Before leaving the country, the facility or the

foreign health professional must present a declaration to SESPAS

                                                

2

 The reference in Article 1 of Law No. 3491 to Law No. 289 does not signify that Article 1, 2, or 3 of Law No. 289

is a measure within the scope of this entry.

ANNEX I, Schedule of the Dominican Republic

 

I-DR-8

 

stating in detail the amounts, if any, the professional has charged to

private patients.

To offer psychology services in the Dominican Republic a

professional must be permanent resident.

ANNEX I, Schedule of the Dominican Republic

 

I-DR-9

 

Sector: Energy Related Services 

 

Obligations Concerned: National Treatment (Article 10.3)

 Market Access (Article 11.4)

 

Measures: - Ley General de Electricidad, No. 125-01, July 26, 2001, Art. 53

 - Ley General de Reforma de la Empresa Pública, No. 141-97,

June 24, 1997, Arts. 13 and 14

 

Description: Cross-Border Services

 

Three joint ventures currently distribute electricity on an exclusive

basis within specified regions of the Dominican Republic pursuant

to concessions granted by the Government of the Dominican

Republic.

ANNEX I, Schedule of the Dominican Republic

 

I-DR-10

 

Sector: Mining

 

Obligations Concerned: National Treatment (Article 10.3)

    

Measures: - Ley de Minería de la República Dominicana, No.146, June 4,

1971, Art. 9

 

Description: Investment

 

Mining concessions may not be granted to any foreign government

either directly or through the intermediation of a natural person or

an enterprise.  In duly justified cases, and with the prior approval

of the National Congress, the Executive Branch may enter into

special agreements with foreign mining enterprises that are

partially or wholly state-owned.

ANNEX I, Schedule of the Dominican Republic

 

I-DR-11

 

Sector: CommunicationsAudio-Visual Services    

 

Obligations Concerned: Performance Requirements (Article 10.9)

National Treatment (Article 11.2)

 Most-Favored-Nation Treatment (Article 11.3)

     

Measures: - Decreto que introduce modificaciones en el Reglamento No. 824,

del 25 de marzo de 1971, sobre la Operación de la Comisión

Nacional de Espectáculos Públicos y Radiodifusión, No. 4306,

February 22, 1974, Arts. 101 and 109

 

 Description: Cross-Border Services and Investment

    

Only Dominican nationals may work as announcers for a radio or

television broadcast to a national audience in the territory of the

Dominican Republic.  However, the Comisión Nacional de

Espectáculos Públicos y Radiofonía may authorize enterprises that

make such broadcasts, in special cases and for a period of six

months, to hire foreign nationals to serve as announcers.  This

authorization may be extended at the discretion of the National

Commission for Public Entertainment and Radio. 

Only Dominican nationals may serve as sports narrators, including

commercial announcers and commentators, in transmitting

sporting events for a national audience in the Domincan Republic. 

However, foreign nationals may serve as sports narrators as long as

in their country of origin Dominican sportscasters may also do so.

In all radio programming that originates in the Dominican

Republic, 50 percent of the music played shall be by Dominican

authors, composers, and singers.

For every three soap operas that are broadcast for a national

audience in the Dominican Republic, one must be by Dominican

authors and must have been made in the Dominican Republic.

ANNEX I, Schedule of the Dominican Republic

 

I-DR-12

 

Sector: CommunicationsAdvertising Services    

 

Obligations Concerned: National Treatment (Article 11.2)

 

Measures: - Reglamento sobre la Operación de la Comisión Nacional de

Espectáculos Públicos y Radiodifusión, No. 824,  March 25, 1971,

Art. 74.

 

 Description: Cross-Border Services

 

Seventy-five percent of all artists, announcers, singers and other

participants in the production of any jingle, video, tape, script,

advertisement for use in cinemas (cintas cinematográficas), or

commercial that is transmitted and presented on radio and

television must be Dominican nationals.  For greater certainty, this

requirement applies only to such advertisements that are produced

in the Dominican Republic.

However, if a commercial for Dominican goods and services to be

sold in the Dominican Republic needs to be produced abroad, 25

percent of the artists and production personnel in charge of

production must be Dominican nationals.  

ANNEX I, Schedule of the Dominican Republic

 

I-DR-13

 

Sector: Communications    News Agency Services

 

Obligations Concerned: Senior Management and Boards of Directors (Article 10.10)

 

Measures: - Ley sobre Expresión y Difusión del Pensamiento, No. 6132,

December 15, 1972, Art. 5

 

Description: Investment

 

The senior manager of every newspaper or periodical produced in

the Dominican Republic must be a Dominican national.   

ANNEX I, Schedule of the Dominican Republic

 

I-DR-14

 

Sector:  Communications    Broadcasting

 

Obligations Concerned: National Treatment (Articles 10.3 and 11.2)

 Market Access (Article 11.4)

 Local Presence (Article 11.5)

 

Measures: - Ley General de Telecomunicaciones, No. 153-98, May 27, 1998,

Chapters V, X and XI

         

Description: Cross-Border Services and Investment

 

In order to obtain a corresponding authorization to install and

operate broadcast networks and to provide broadcast services in

the Dominican Republic it is required to have a legal domicile in

the Dominican Republic and be a stock company (compañia por

acciones) or a non-profit organization incorporated under the laws

of the Dominican Republic. 

Only Dominican nationals may own and control an enterprise that

provides public radio broadcasting services that originate in the

Dominican Republic.

For greater certainty, this entry does not apply to content providers.

ANNEX I, Schedule of the Dominican Republic

 

I-DR-15

 

Sector:  Communications

 

Obligations Concerned:  Market Access (Article 11.4)

 Local Presence (Article 11.5)

 

Measures: - Ley General de Telecomunicaciones, No. 153-98, May 27, 1998,

Chapter V

         

Description: Cross-Border Services

 

In order to obtain the corresponding authorization to install and

operate telecommunications networks in the Dominican Republic,

in order to provide telecommunications services to users in the

Dominican Republic, it is required to have a legal domicile in the

Dominican Republic and be a stock company (compañia por

acciones) incorporated under the laws of the Dominican Republic.

ANNEX I, Schedule of the Dominican Republic

 

I-DR-16

 

Sector: Distribution, Trade, and Commission Agent Services

 

Obligations Concerned: Market Access (Article 11.4) 

 Local Presence (Article 11.5)

 Performance Requirements (Article 10.9)

 

Measures: - Ley de Promoción Agrícola y Ganadera,  No. 532, December 12,

1969, Art. 41 

 - Reglamento sobre Preparación, Clasificación y Transporte del

Café, No. 7107, September 18, 1961, Art. 15

 - Ley que Establece que el Instituto de Estabilización de Precios

será el Distribuidor Único del Azúcar de Producción Nacional

para el Consumo Interno, No. 80, November 28, 1974, Art. 1

 - Ley que Crea e Integra el Consejo de Administración Salinera,

como Distribuidor Exclusivo de toda la Sal en Grano de Origen

Marino Producido en el País, No. 286-98, July 29, 1998, Art. 1, y

su Reglamento de Aplicación, No. 1294-00, December 13, 2001

  

 

Description: Cross-Border Services and Investment

 

Only enterprises organized as stock companies (compañias por

acciones) under Dominican law may operate as deposit

warehouses for the care and conservation of imported goods.

Coffee for export must be packed in locally manufactured sacks.

Only the Instituto de Estabilización de Precios (INESPRE) may

distribute domestically produced sugar in the Dominican Republic.

Only the Consejo de Administración Salinera may distribute

marine unrefined salt produced in the Dominican Republic.

ANNEX I, Schedule of the Dominican Republic

 

I-DR-17

 

Sector: Tourism and Services Related to Travel

 

Obligations Concerned: National Treatment (Article 11.2)

 Local Presence  (Article 11.5)

    

Measures: - Ley Orgánica de Turismo, No. 541, December 31, 1969, Arts. 18

and 23

 - Reglamento para el Trasporte Terrestre Turístico de Pasajeros,

No. 817-03, August 20, 2003, Art. 11

 - Decreto que Autoriza el Establecimiento de Casinos, Juegos de

Bingo y Tragamonedas, No. 6273, December 8, 1960, Art. 2

 

Description: Cross-Border Services

 

To operate in the Dominican Republic, foreign travel agencies and

tour operators must be duly authorized in their country of origin

and represented by a local agency. 

Tour guide licenses may be granted to foreign nationals only in

exceptional circumstances, such as when no Dominican tour guide

can satisfy the needs of a particular tour group, including the need

to speak a particular language.

All casino and game employees must be Dominican nationals.

Drivers for land transport of tourists must be Dominican nationals

or foreign nationals resident in the Dominican Republic.

ANNEX I, Schedule of the Dominican Republic

 

I-DR-18

 

 Sector:   Recreational and Cultural Services

 

Obligations Concerned: National Treatment (Article 11.2)

 

Measures: - Ley sobre Expresión y Difusión del Pensamiento, No. 6132,

December 15, 1972, Art. 33

 - Reglamento sobre la Operación de la Comisión Nacional de

Espectáculos Públicos y Radiodifusión, No. 824, March 25,1971,

Art. 122

 

Description:   Cross-Border Services

 

Variety shows offered to audiences in theaters, nightclubs, and

other entertainment venues that are performed by foreign artists

must include the performance of one Dominican artist for each

foreign artist.

ANNEX I, Schedule of the Dominican Republic

 

I-DR-19

 

Sector: Transportation Maritime Transportation

 

Obligations Concerned: National Treatment (Articles 10.3 and 11.2)

Senior Management and Boards of Directors (Article 10.10)

 Local Presence (Article 11.5)

 

Measures:                              - Ley sobre Policía de Puertos y Costas, No. 3003, May 17, 1951

Art. 56 and its paragraph

 - Ley sobre Protección y Desarrollo de la Marina Mercante, No.

180, May 30, 1975, Arts. 1 and  4

 - Decreto  que Establece el Reglamento Tarifario de la Autoridad

Portuaria Dominicana, No. 572-99, December 30, 1999, Art. 3,

para. I, subparas. a and b, note 2

 

Description: Cross-Border Services and Investment

 

Vessels used for towing, passenger or freight transportation, or

loading or unloading in Dominican ports, as well as vessels used to

navigate inland waterways in the Dominican Republic, must be

Dominican flagged vessels.

Cabotage in the Dominican Republic is exclusively reserved for

national flagged vessels.  When a Dominican flag vessel cannot

perform this service, a temporary permit may be granted to a

national shipowner for a foreign flag vessel to offer this service.

All Dominican Republic flag ships of more than 50 tons, providing

cabotage are exempt from the requirement to have a harbor pilot

on board and to pay pilotage fees provided they do not transport

cargo abroad.

When loading and unloading merchandise or passengers,

Dominican Republic flag vessels pay 50 percent of the amount set

for foreign-flag vessels.  The fees for foreign flag vessels range

from 1.00 U.S. dollars per foot of beam per day in port to 1.15 U.S.

dollars per foot of beam per day in port. 

Tariffs applied to foreign tourist yachts3 will be 0.50 U.S. dollars

per foot of beam per day or its equivalent in Dominican pesos

(RD$).  The fees for national tourist yachts range from RD$

300.00 for 25 passengers to RD$ 800.00 for up to 99 passengers,

and for 100 or more passengers, the fee increases by RD$ 10.00 for

each passenger.

                                                

3

 For greater certainty, this tariff does not apply to cruise vessels.

ANNEX I, Schedule of the Dominican Republic

 

I-DR-20

 

For purposes of this entry, national shipowner means a shipowner

who is a Dominican national and resides in the Dominican

Republic.  If the ship is co-owned or is community property, 70

percent of its value must belong to Dominicans residing in the

Dominican Republic.

Enterprises organized under Dominican law, whose main purpose

is the administration of Dominican flag vessels and maritime

commercial passenger and/or freight transportation, must comply

with the following requirements:

(a) 70 percent of the shares and participations, as well as 70

percent of the subscribed and paid-in capital, must belong

to Dominican nationals that reside in the Dominican

Republic or enterprises organized under Dominican law.

(b) 75 percent of the Board of Directors must be Dominican

nationals residing in the Dominican Republic; and

(c)  it must be organized as a stock company (compañia por

acciones) under Dominican law and have its main

headquarters and official domicile in the Dominican

Republic.

ANNEX I, Schedule of the Dominican Republic

 

I-DR-21

 

Sector:   Air Transportation

  

Obligations Concerned: National Treatment (Article 10.3) – Senior Management and

Boards of Directors (Article 10.9)

 

Measures: - Ley sobre Aeronáutica Civil, No. 505, November 10, 1969, Arts.

128, 130 and 140

 - Decreto que Reglamenta u Regula los Operadores, Agentes y

Consignatarios de Vuelos no Regulares, No.751-02, September

19,2002, Arts. 1 and 2

 

Description: Investment

 

Air transportation of passengers, cargo or correspondence between

destinations within the Dominican Republic (cabotage) is reserved

for aircraft owned by Dominican persons.

For puposes of the preceding paragraph, enterprises shall be

deemed to be Dominican enterprises when at least 51 percent of

their capital is owned by Dominican nationals and at least 51

percent of their administrators are Dominican nationals as well.

All enterprises performing the functions of operator, agent, or non-

regular (charter) flight consignee, must be organized under

Dominican law, must be at least 51 percent owned by Dominican

nationals, and must employ Dominican nationals in senior

management.

ANNEX I, Schedule of the Dominican Republic

 

I-DR-22

 

Sector: Air Transportation Specialty Air Services and Maintenance and

Repair of Aircraft

 

Obligations Concerned: National Treatment (Article 11.2)

    Most-Favored-Nation Treatment (Article 11.3)

 

Measures: - Ley sobre Aeronáutica Civil, No. 505, November 10, 1969, Arts.

79, 82, and 128

 

Description: Cross-Border Services

 

Aerial advertising and publicity, agricultural works, fumigation,

fishing prospects, air taxis, filming, photography, and surveyance

shall be reserved for Dominican persons.

The Dirección General de Aeronáutica Civil may issue temporary

permits to foreign pilots that come to the country to perform air

transport services on a temporary basis, provided that it is

demonstrated that there is no available Dominican personnel to

provide the service.

Foreign nationals may engage in remunerated aeronautical

activities only if they hold licenses or certificates either issued in

the Dominican Republic, or issued in a foreign country in which

Dominican nationals holding licenses or certificates issued in the

Dominican Republic are able to engage in such remunerated

aeronautical activities.

ANNEX I, Schedule of the Dominican Republic

 

I-DR-23

 

Sector: Free Zones

 

Obligations Concerned: Performance Requirements (Article 10.9)

 

Measures: - Ley sobre Fomento de Zonas Francas, No. 8-90, January 15,

1990, Art. 17

 

Description: Investment

 

An enterprise established in the Free Zone of the Dominican

Republic may not introduce more than 20 percent of its total sales

in goods or services into the Dominican Republic’s customs

territory.

This non-comforming measure shall cease to exist no later than

December 31, 2009 in accordance Article 3.4 (Waiver of Customs

Duties), paragraph 3.

ANNEX I, Schedule of the Dominican Republic

 

I-DR-24

 

Sector: Oil Exploitation and Exploration Services

 

Obligations Concerned: National Treatment (Article 10.3)

 

Measures: - Ley sobre la Exploración, Explotación y Beneficios por

Particulares de los Yacimientos de Petróleo y sus Derivados, los

Hidrocarburos y demás Combustibles Similares, No. 4532, August

30, 1956, Art. 4

 

Description: Investment

 

Sovereign foreign governments may not be granted the right to

explore, exploit, or benefit from oil and other hydrocarbon

substances, nor shall any natural person or enterprise enjoying

these rights allow a sovereign foreign government as a partner,

associate, or shareholder.

ANNEX I, Schedule of the Dominican Republic

 

I-DR-25

 

Sector: Fishing

 

Obligations Concerned: National Treatment (Article 10.3)

 

Measures: - Ley de Pesca, No. 5914, May 22, 1962, Arts. 15 (para. 1), and 19

(paras. a and b)

 - Proyecto de Ley que crea el Consejo Dominicano de Pesca y

Acuicultura, Art. 41

 

Description: Investment

 

Only natural persons residing in the Dominican Republic or

enterprises organized under Dominican law may obtain fishing

permits or fishing licenses.

To engage in maritime or fluvial fishing and hunting, an enterprise

must be organized under Dominican law and 50 percent of its

capital must be owned by Dominican nationals.

In order to obtain fishing permits, foreign-flag vessels must be

previously authorized by the Marina de Guerra and the Dirección

Nacional de Drogas.

Only Dominican nationals may engage in artisanal fishing within

54 nautical miles of the coast.

ANNEX I, Schedule of the Dominican Republic

 

I-DR-26

 

Sector: Educational Services

 

Obligations Concerned: Market Access (Article 11.4)

 Local Presence (Article 11.5)

 

Measures: - Ley sobre Educación Superior, Ciencia y Tecnología, No. 139-

01, August 13, 2001, Art. 44

 - Reglamento Orgánico para las Instituciones Educativas, No.

66,97, May 28, 1999, Art. 19.2

 

Description: Cross-Border Services

 

To teach at any Education Center in the kindergarten, pre-school,

elementary, intermediate, high school, technical, or university

level, a foreign national must reside in the Dominican Republic.

The Secretaría de Estado de Educación Superior, Ciencia y

Tecnología (SEESCYT) may deny a request to create a new

institution of higher learning or professional or technical institute if

there is no economic need of such institution or institute.

For greater certainty, this entry does not apply to the supply of

foreign language training, corporate, business, and industrial

training programs, skill development programs, or educational

consulting services, including technical support and development

of curriculums and programs.  It also does not apply to foreign

educational institutions that offer their programs through

institutions already established in the Dominican Republic.

ANNEX I, Schedule of the Dominican Republic

 

I-DR-27

 

Sector: Cooperative Associations

 

Obligations Concerned: National Treatment (Article 10.3)

 

Measures: - Ley sobre Asociaciones Cooperativas, No. 127-64, January 27,

1964, Arts. 1, 50, and 51    

 

Description: Investment 

 

Cooperatives are non-profit associations constituted by natural

persons residing in the Dominican Republic or enterprises

organized under the laws of the Dominican Republic.

They may accept foreign nationals residing in the Dominican

Republic as associates in a proportion not larger than 50 percent of

the total membership and shares.

ANNEX I, Schedule of the Dominican Republic

 

I-DR-28

 

Sector: Lotteries

 

Obligations Concerned: Market Access (Article 11.4)

 

Measures: - Ley que Estable una Renta Pública bajo la Denominación de

Lotería Nacional, No. 5158, June 25, 1959, Arts. 1, 2, and 3

 

Description: Cross-Border Services 

 

The Lotería Nacional is the state enterprise that operates and

manages the lottery of the Dominican Republic.  A private

enterprise currently holds an exclusive concession to provide

electronic lottery services in the Dominican Republic.

Under Dominican law, a lottery is any system used to distribute

prizes in money through raffles among people buying tickets for

that purpose.

ANNEX I, Schedule of the Dominican Republic

 

I-DR-29

 

 Sector: Retail Distribution of Pharmaceutical Products

 

Obligations Concerned: Market Access (Article 11.4)

 

Measures: - Ley General de Salud, No. 42-01, March 8, 2001, Art. 103

 

Description: Cross-Border Services

 

Pharmaceutical establishments shall be at a distance of at least 500

meters from each other.  For purposes of this entry, pharmaceutical

establishment means a pharmacy, drug store, or industrial

pharmaceutical laboratory. 

 

   

ANNEX I, Schedule of the Dominican Republic

 

I-DR-30

 

Sector: Services Incidental to Mining, Hydro-Electric Plant Construction

and Management; Electricity Transmission, Marketing and

Distribution Services; Public Irrigation Services; Management and

Operation of Water Distribution and Waste Management Services;

Airport and Port Construction, Operation and Management

Services; and Operation of Lotteries

 

Obligations Concerned: Market Access (Article 11.4)

 

Existing Measures: - Ley Minera de la República Dominicana, No. 146, June 4, 1971,

Art. 3

 - Ley General de Electricidad, No. 125-01, July 26, 2001, Art. 41

 - Ley sobre el Dominio de Aguas Terrestre y Distribución de

Aguas Publicas, No. 5852, March 29, 1962, Arts. 17 and 18

- Ley que Crea el Instituto Nacional de Recursos Hidráulicos

(INDRHI), No. 6, September 8, 1964, Art. 4

 - Ley que Estable una Renta Pública bajo la Denominación de

Lotería Nacional, No. 5158,  June 25, 1959, Arts. 1 and 3

 

Description: Cross-Border Services

 

In granting concessions to supply the following services:

 

construction or temporary management of a hydro-electric

power plant;

construction or temporary management of an electric

transmission project;

distribution or marketing of electricity;

irrigation services or construction, management, operation,

or maintenance of water distribution or waste management

services;

construction, operation, or management of a port or airport; 

services incidental to mining; or

operation of lotteries;

the Dominican Republic reserves the right to impose limitations on

the number of service suppliers in the form of numerical quotas,

monopolies, or exclusive service suppliers; or require supply of

these services through a joint venture.

ANNEX I, Schedule of the Dominican Republic

 

I-DR-31

 

 

For greater certainty, any other conditions on the grant of such

concession shall be otherwise consistent with the Agreement and

services suppliers of the other Parties will be permitted to obtain

such concessions.

 

El Salvador Schedule

Schedule of El Salvador

Sector: All Sectors

Obligations Concerned: National Treatment (Article 10.3)

 Most-Favored-Nation Treatment (Article 10.4)

 

Level of Government: Central

 

Measures: Constitución de la República de El Salvador, Arts. 95 and 109

 

Description: Investment

Rural land may not be owned by a foreign person, including a

branch of a foreign person, if the person is a national of a country

or is organized under the law of a country that does not permit

Salvadoran persons to own rural land, except in the case of land to

be used for industrial plants. 

An enterprise organized under Salvadoran law, a majority of

whose capital is owned by foreign persons, or a majority of whose

partners are foreign persons, is subject to the preceding paragraph. 

 

  

ANNEX I, Schedule of El Salvador

 

I-ES-2

 

Sector: All Sectors

 

Obligations Concerned: National Treatment (Article 10.3)

 Most-Favored-Nation Treatment (Article 10.4)

 

Level of Government: Central

 

Measures: Constitución de la República de El Salvador, Arts. 95 and 115

 

 Ley de Inversiones, Legislative Decree No. 732, Art. 7

 

 Código de Comercio, Art. 6

 

Description: Investment

Only the following persons may engage in small scale commerce,

industry, and the supply of services in El Salvador:

(a) Salvadoran nationals born in El Salvador; and

(b) nationals of Central American Parties.

An enterprise organized under Salvadoran law, a majority of

whose capital is owned by foreign persons, or a majority of whose

partners are foreign persons, may not establish a small scale

enterprise to engage in small scale commerce, industry, and the

supply of services (“small scale enterprise”).  For purposes of this

entry, a small scale enterprise is an enterprise with a capitalization

not greater than 200,000 U.S. dollars. 

 

 

ANNEX I, Schedule of El Salvador

 

I-ES-3

 

Sector: Cooperative Production Societies

 

Obligations Concerned: National Treatment (Article 10.3)

 

Level of Government: Central

 

Measures: Reglamento de la Ley General de Asociaciones Cooperativas, Title

VI, Chapter 1, Art. 84 

 

Description: Investment

In cooperative production societies, at least 75 percent of the total

number of partners must be Salvadoran persons.

For purposes of this non-conforming measure, a branch of an

enterprise that is not organized under Salvadoran law is not a

Salvadoran person.

For greater certainty, a cooperative production society exists to

provide certain benefits to its members including with respect to

distribution, sales, management, and technical assistance.  Its

functions are not only economic but also social.   

 

ANNEX I, Schedule of El Salvador

 

I-ES-4

 

Sector: Duty-Free Commercial Centers and Establishments

 

Obligations Concerned: National Treatment (Article 10.3)

 

Level of Government: Central

 

Measures: Constitución de la República de El Salvador, Art. 95

 

 Ley para el Establecimiento de Tiendas Libres en los Puertos

Marítimos de El Salvador, Art. 5

 

Description: Investment

Only Salvadoran nationals born in El Salvador and enterprises

organized under Salvadoran law may apply for a permit to

establish duty-free commercial centers or establishments in El

Salvador`s seaports.

 

However, an enterprise organized under Salvadoran law, a

majority of whose capital is owned by foreign persons, or a

majority of whose partners are foreign persons, may not establish

duty free commercial centers or establishments in El Salvador’s

seaports.

 

ANNEX I, Schedule of El Salvador

 

I-ES-5

 

Sector: Air Services    Specialty Air Services

 

Obligations Concerned: Most-Favored-Nation Treatment (Article 11.3)

 National Treatment (Article 11.2)

 

Level of Government: Central

 

Measures: Ley Orgánica de Aviación Civil, Arts. 5, 89, and 92

 

Description: Cross-Border Services

The supply of specialty air services requires prior authorization

from the Autoridad de Aviación Civil.  Authorization from the civil

aviation authority is subject to reciprocity and must take into

account national air transport policy.  

ANNEX I, Schedule of El Salvador

 

I-ES-6

 

Sector: Air Services    Aircraft Repair and Maintenance Services During

which an Aircraft is Withdrawn from Service and Pilots of

Specialty Air Services

 

Obligations Concerned: National Treatment (Article 11.2)

 Most-Favored-Nation Treatment (Article 11.3)

 

Level of Government: Central

 

Measures: Ley Orgánica de Aviación Civil, Arts. 39 and 40

 

Description: Cross-Border Services

El Salvador applies reciprocity requirements when determining

whether to recognize or validate licenses, certificates, and permits

issued by foreign air transport authorities to: 

(a) technical staff supplying aircraft repair and maintenance

services while an aircraft is withdrawn from service; and 

(b) pilots and other technical staff supplying specialty air

services.

  

ANNEX I, Schedule of El Salvador

 

I-ES-7

Sector: Communications Services    Advertising and Promotional

Services for Radio and Television

 

Obligations Concerned: Most-Favored-Nation Treatment (Article 11.3)

 National Treatment (Article 11.2)

 

Level of Government: Central

 

Measures: Decreto de las disposiciones para regular la explotación de obras

de naturaleza intelectual por medios de comunicación pública y la

participación de artistas salvadoreños en espectáculos públicos, 

Legislative Decree No. 239, June 9, 1983, published in Diario

Oficial No. 111, Vol. 279, June 15, 1983, Art. 4

 

 Decree No. 18, Sustitución de los artículos 1 y 4 del Decreto

Legislativo No. 239, June 9, 1983, published in Diario Oficial No.

7, Vol. 282, January 10, 1984

 

Description: Cross-Border Services

At least 90 percent of the production and recording of any

commercial advertisement for use in El Salvador’s public

communications media, meaning over-the-air television and radio

broadcasts and printed material that originate in El Salvador, must

be carried out by enterprises organized under Salvadoran law.

A commercial advertisement produced or recorded by an enterprise

organized under the law of another Central American Party may be

used in the Salvadoran media, as long as similar treatment is

extended by that Party to commercial advertisements produced or

recorded in El Salvador.

The broadcast in El Salvador`s public media of a commercial

advertisement for an international product, brand, or service that

has been imported into El Salvador or produced in El Salvador

under license and does not satisfy the requirements referenced

above will be permitted and may be subject to a one-time-fee. 

 

ANNEX I, Schedule of El Salvador

 

I-ES-8

 

Sector: Communications Services    Television and Radio Broadcasting

Services

 

Obligations Concerned: National Treatment (Article 10.3)

 

Level of Government: Central

 

Measures: Ley de Telecomunicaciones, Art. 123

 

Description: Investment

Concessions and licenses for free reception broadcasting services

shall only be granted to Salvadoran nationals born in El Salvador

or enterprises organized under Salvadoran law whose equity

capital is at least 51 percent owned by Salvadoran persons. 

  

 

ANNEX I, Schedule of El Salvador

 

I-ES-9

Sector: Performing Arts 

 

Obligations Concerned: National Treatment (Article 11.2)

 

Level of Government: Central

 

Measures: Ley de Migración, Arts. 62-A and 62-B

 

 Legislative Decree No. 382, May 29, 1970, published in Diario

Oficial No. 64,Vol. 227, April 10, 1970

 

 Executive Decree No. 16, May 12,1970, published in Diario

Oficial No. 87, Vol. 227, May 18, 1970, Art. 1

 

Description: Cross-Border Services

No foreign artist may give paid performances of any kind without

the prior express authorization of the Ministerio de Gobernación,

which shall first seek, within 15 days, the advisory opinion of the

legally established craft union of the artistic field in which the

artist is involved.  Foreign artists shall pay, to the relevant union, a

performance fee deposit of 10 percent of the gross income likely to

be earned in the country.  Where it is not possible to make the

advance payment, the artist shall pay an adequate amount as a

“security deposit” to the relevant union.

No foreign artist or group of artists may perform in the country for

more than 30 days consecutively or intermittently within a year

from the date of the first performance.

An artist is any person acting in El Salvador, individually or in a

company consisting of one or more persons, to give performances

in music, song, dance or readings, or to present shows, whether in

person (i.e., live) or before a large or small audience or on radio or

television. 

 

ANNEX I, Schedule of El Salvador

 

I-ES-10

 

Sector: Circuses

 

Obligations Concerned: National Treatment (Article 11.2)

 

Level of Government: Central

 

Measures: Ley de Migración, Art. 62-C

 

 Decree No. 122, November 4,1988, published in Diario Oficial No.

219, Vol. 301, November 25, 1988, Art. 3

 

 Legislative Decree No. 382, May 29, 1970, published in Diario

Oficial No. 64, Vol. 227, April 10,1970

 

 Decree No. 193, March 8, 1989, published in Diario Oficial No.

54, Vol. 302, March 17, 1989, Arts. 1 and 2

 

 Reglamento para la Aplicación de los Decretos Legislativos 122

and 193 Relativos a Empresas Circenses, Arts. 1 and 2 

 

Description: Cross-Border Services

Foreign circuses or other similar shows must pay to the relevant

circus union a performance fee equal to 2.5 percent of the gross

income likely to be earned daily from ticket sales.  The fee must be

paid in full through the withholding system. 

All foreign circuses must be authorized by the appropriate Ministry

and once authorized, notify the Asociación Salvadoreña de

Empresarios Circenses (ASEC) and pay ASEC 3 percent of the

gross income earned from ticket sales for each performance, as

well as 10 percent of total earnings from sales to the audience,

inside the circus, of flags, caps, tee shirts, balloons, photographs

and other paraphernalia.  The foreign circus shall pay an adequate

amount as a security deposit to ASEC.

A foreign circus entering El Salvador may only work in the city of

San Salvador for 15 days, which may be extended for a further 15

days. 

A foreign circus that has performed in El Salvador can only return

to the country after at least one year has elapsed since the date on

which the circus left the country. 

 

ANNEX I, Schedule of El Salvador

 

I-ES-11

Sector: Performing Arts

 

Obligations Concerned: National Treatment (Article 11.2)

 

Level of Government: Central

 

Measures: Decreto de las disposiciones para regular la explotación de obras

de naturaleza intelectual por medios de comunicación pública y la

participación de artistas salvadoreños en espectáculos públicos,

 Legislative Decree No. 239, June 9, 1983, published in Diario

Oficial No. 111, Vol. 279, June 15, 1983, Art. 3

 

 Decree No. 18, Sustitución de los artículos 1 y 4 del Decreto

Legislativo No. 239, June 9, 1983, published in Diario Oficial No.

7, Vol. 282, January 10, 1984

 

Description: Cross-Border Services

In the case of public performances involving the live participation

of artists of any kind, the participation of Salvadoran nationals

shall be equivalent to 20 percent of the number of participating

foreigners.

 

ANNEX I, Schedule of El Salvador

 

I-ES-12

Sector: Construction and Related Engineering Services

 

Obligations Concerned: Most-Favored-Nation Treatment (Articles 10.4 and 11.3)

 National Treatment (Articles 10.3 and 11.2)

 Local Presence (Article 11.5)

 

Level of Government: Central

 

Measures: Ley de Incentivos a las Empresas Nacionales de la Industria de la

Construcción, Legislative Decree No. 504, published in Diario

Oficial No. 167, Vol. 308, July 9, 1990, as amended by

 

 Legislative Decree No. 733, published in Diario Oficial No. 80,

Vol. 311, April 23, 1991

 

Description: Cross-Border Services and Investment 

To participate in design activities, consulting, consulting and

management of engineering or architectural projects, or any type of

work or study relating to such projects’ construction, whether

before, during, or after construction, an enterprise a majority of

whose capital is owned by foreign nationals (“foreign enterprise”)

must be contractually associated with an enterprise established in

El Salvador (“Salvadoran enterprise”) that is legally registered and

qualified with the Ministerio de Obras Públicas, unless the foreign

enterprise determines that such Salvadoran enterprise is not

available.

The foreign enterprise must have a resident representative in El

Salvador.

Further, an engineering or architectural project is subject to the

following requirements:

(a) enterprises organized under Salvadoran law must have an

investment in the project equal to at least 20 percent of the

value of the project; and 

(b) such enterprises must supply at least 30 percent of the

technical staff and 90 percent of the administrative staff on

the project.

The requirements of subparagraph (b) do not apply if the

foreign enterprise determines that Salvadoran enterprises are

not able to provide the necessary resources.

ANNEX I, Schedule of El Salvador

 

I-ES-13

For greater certainty, technical staff and administrative staff do not

include senior management.  The requirements of subparagraphs

(a) and (b) do not apply:

(i) when the funds for the project come partially or entirely from

foreign governments or international organizations; or

(ii) to specific projects or grants for specialized technical

cooperation. 

 

  

 

ANNEX I, Schedule of El Salvador

 

I-ES-14

 

Sector: Public Accounting and Public Auditing

 

Obligations Concerned: Most-Favored-Nation Treatment (Articles 10.4 and 11.3) 

 National Treatment (Articles 10.3 and 11.2)

 

Level of Government: Central

 

Measures: Ley Reguladora del Ejercicio de la Contaduría, Arts. 2, 3, and 4

 

Description: Cross-Border Services and Investment 

Only a Salvadoran national may be authorized as a public

accountant.  Only a person authorized as a public accountant may

be authorized as an external auditor.

For an enterprise to be authorized to supply public accounting

services, the principal partners, shareholders, or associates must be

Salvadoran nationals, and at least one person among the partners,

shareholders, associates, or administrators must be authorized as a

public accountant in El Salvador. 

ANNEX I, Schedule of El Salvador

 

I-ES-15

 

Sector: Professional Services:  

 - Architectural Services

 - Engineering Services

 - Integrated Engineering Services

 - Urban Planning and Landscaping Services

 

Obligations Concerned: National Treatment (Article 11.2)

 Local Presence (Article 11.5)

 

Level of Government: Central

 

Measures: Ley de Urbanismo y Construcción, Arts. 4 and 8 

 

 Registro Nacional de Arquitectos, Ingenieros, Proyectistas y

Constructores, Executive Decree No. 34, published in Diario

Oficial No. 4, Vol. 306, January 8, 1990  

 

 Reglamento Interno del Consejo Nacional de Arquitectos,

Ingenieros, Proyectistas y Constructores, Executive Decree No. 75,

published in Diario Oficial No. 11, Vol. 310, January 17, 1991,

Arts. 25, 26, and 27

 

Description: Cross-Border Services

Only architects and engineers who are inscribed in the Registro

Nacional de Arquitectos, Ingenieros, Proyectistas y Constructores

(“Registro Nacional”) may supervise architectural and engineering

work on construction projects and sign and seal architectural or

engineering plans for such projects.

An architect or engineer must be resident in El Salvador to be

inscribed in the Registro Nacional.

Draftsmen,  builders, and electrical installation technicians must be

Salvadoran nationals in order to be inscribed in the Registro

Nacional. 

 

ANNEX I, Schedule of El Salvador

 

I-ES-16

Sector: Professional Services:  Health Services

  (Including but not limited to: General and Specialist Medical

Services, Dental Services, Veterinary Services, Paramedical

Services, Services rendered by Psychologists, Midwives, Nurses,

Physiotherapists, Chemists and Qualified Clinical Laboratory

Technicians, and Technical and Auxiliary Staff) 

 

Obligations Concerned: Most-Favored-Nation Treatment (Article 11.3)

 National Treatment (Article 11.2)

 Local Presence (Article 11.5)

 

Level of Government:  Central

 

Measures: Código de Salud, Arts. 4, 5, 17, 23, 30, 31, 32, and 306

 

Description: Cross-Border Services

A permit is necessary for the exercise of the health services

professions and their specialized, technical, and auxiliary activities. 

Permits are issued by the appropriate Junta de Vigilancia.  The

Junta de Vigilancia may grant permanent, temporary, or

provisional permits.  A permanent permit is available only for

private professional activity.  Other permits are subject to

restrictions and limitations in accordance with the law for specified

reasons.  

To grant a permanent permit the Junta de Vigilancia shall require

that persons be Salvadoran nationals by birth or authorized to

permanently reside in the country. 

In addition to fulfilling the requirements under the law, foreigners

must provide proof that the jurisdiction in which they earned their

qualification allows Salvadoran nationals or graduates to practice

their profession in analogous circumstances. 

 

ANNEX I, Schedule of El Salvador

 

I-ES-17

 

Sector: Professional Services    Legal Services (Notary Public)

 

Obligations Concerned: Most-Favored-Nation Treatment (Article 11.3)

 National Treatment (Article 11.2)

 Local Presence (Article 11.5)

 

Level of Government: Central

 

Measures: Ley de Notariado, Art. 4

 

Description: Cross-Border Services

Only persons authorized by the Supreme Court of Justice may

exercise the profession of notary public.  Only Salvadoran

nationals who are attorneys may obtain such authorization.

Central American nationals who have been authorized to practice

law in El Salvador and who have resided in the country for at least

two years may also obtain such authorization, provided that:

(a) they have not been barred from practicing the profession of

notary public in their own country; and

(b) Salvadoran nationals may practice the same profession in

their country without any additional requirements than those

laid down in Salvadoran law. 

ANNEX I, Schedule of El Salvador

 

I-ES-18

 

Sector: Professional Services  – Teachers

 

Obligations Concerned: National Treatment (Article 11.2)

 

Level of Government: Central

 

Measures: Constitución de la República, Art. 60

 

Description: Cross-Border Services

Only Salvadoran nationals may teach national history and the

Constitution. 

ANNEX I, Schedule of El Salvador

 

I-ES-19

 

Sector: Professional Services: Customs Agents

  

Obligations Concerned: Most-Favored-Nation Treatment (Articles 10.4 and 11.3)

 National Treatment (Articles 10.3 and 11.2)

 

Level of Government: Central

 

Measures: Reglamento del Código Aduanero Uniforme Centroamericano, 

 Art. 18

 

Description: Cross-Border Services and Investment

Only nationals of the Central American Parties may work as

customs agents. 

 

ANNEX I, Schedule of El Salvador

 

I-ES-20

 

Sector: Transport Services    Road Transport Services 

 

Obligations Concerned: National Treatment (Articles 10.3 and 11.2)

 

Measures: Constitución de la República de El Salvador, Art. 95  

 

 Ley de Transporte Terrestre, Tránsito y Seguridad Vial, Arts. 38-A

and 38-B

 

 Reglamento General de Transporte Terrestre, Arts. 1 and 2

    

Level of Government: Central

 

Description: Cross-Border Services and Investment

Permits for the supply of services in passenger transport, regular

and non-regular, within El Salvador may only be granted to

Salvadoran nationals or their partners. 

Only vehicles with Salvadoran license plates may transport goods

from points in El Salvador to other points in El Salvador.

At least 51 percent of the equity capital of an enterprise engaged in

such goods transport in El Salvador must be owned by Salvadoran

persons.  If such capital is owned by an enterprise, at least 51

percent of the stock of that enterprise must be owned by

Salvadoran nationals.

ANNEX I, Schedule of El Salvador

 

I-ES-21

 

Sector: Energy

 

Obligations Concerned:  Market Access (Article 11.4)

 

Measures:  Ley reguladora del deposito, transporte y distribución de

productos de petróleo, Art. 8

 

Description: Cross-Border Services 

The construction of a gas service station will not be authorized if it

is not a prudent distance from another gas station, in order to avoid

excessive concentration.  A prudent distance is considered one of

not less than 600 meters in an urban area and 10 kilometers in a

rural area.  The 10 kilometer requirement also applies to one-way

roads.  For two-way roads containing medians, the distance will be

measured on each side of the road independently. 

 

 

ANNEX I, Schedule of El Salvador

 

I-ES-22

 

Sector: Land Transport 

 

Obligations Concerned:  Market Access (Article 11.4)

 

Measures:  Reglamento General de Transporte Terrestre, Title III, Art. 11 and

Title V, Arts. 29 and 30

 

Description: Cross-Border Services 

Public passenger land transportation concessions for a specific

route will be limited, subject to technical studies of existing

demand.  A free public passenger land transportation concession is

limited to one vehicle.

 

Guatemala Schedule

Schedule of Guatemala

Sector: All Sectors

Obligations Concerned: National Treatment (Article 10.3)

Level of Government: Central

Measures: Decree No. 118-96 that amends Decree Nos. 38-71 and 48-72,

Arts. 1 and 2

 

Description: Investment

 Only the following persons may be granted title to, rent, or use

state-owned lands in the Department of El Petén:

(1) Guatemalans by birth who do not own rural real estate

anywhere in the country that exceeds 45 hectares; and

(2) Guatemalans by birth who do not own industrial, mining or

commercial enterprises.

 Enterprises owned 100 percent by Guatemalans by birth that meet

the requirements set out in the preceding paragraph may be granted

title to, rent, or use state-owned lands in the Department of El

Petén.

 

 

ANNEX I, Schedule of Guatemala

I-GU-2

Sector: All Sectors

Obligations Concerned: National Treatment (Article 10.3)

Level of Government: Central

Measures: Ley de Titulación Supletoria, Decree 49-79, Art. 2

Description: Investment

 Only Guatemalans by birth and enterprises that are majority owned

by Guatemalans by birth may take adverse possession of real

estate.

 

ANNEX I, Schedule of Guatemala

I-GU-3

Sector: All Sectors

Obligations Concerned: National Treatment (Article 10.3)

Level of Government: Central

Measures: Constitución Política de la República de Guatemala, Art. 122

 Ley Reguladora de las Áreas de Reservas Territoriales del Estado

de Guatemala, Decree No. 126-97, Art. 5

Description: Investment

 Foreign nationals require an authorization from the Oficina de

Control de Areas de Reserva del Estado to acquire ownership of

the following state-owned land:

(a) real estate located in urban zones; and

(b) real estate for which rights were registered in the General

Property Registry before March 1, 1956 in the following

locations:

(i) a 3-kilometer-long strip of land along the ocean;

(ii) 200 meters around the lakeshores;

(iii) 100 meters on either side of the navigable rivers; and

(iv) 50 meters around any spring that serves as a source of

water for the population.

 Only the Government may rent state-owned land described above

to enterprises organized under Guatemalan law. 

ANNEX I, Schedule of Guatemala

I-GU-4

Sector: All Sectors

Obligations Concerned: National Treatment (Article 10.3)

Level of Government: Central

Measures: Constitución Política de la República de Guatemala, Art. 123

Description: Investment

 Only Guatemalans by birth and enterprises 100 percent owned by

Guatemalans by birth may own or possess real property located

within 15 kilometers of the borders. 

 Foreign nationals may, however, own or possess urban real estate

and real estate for which rights were registered in the General

Property Registry before March 1, 1956 within the 15 kilometer

area. 

 

 

ANNEX I, Schedule of Guatemala

I-GU-5

Sector:  All Sectors

Obligations Concerned: National Treatment (Article 10.3)

Level of Government: Central

Measures: Código de Comercio, Decree No. 2-70, and its amendments

contained in Decree No. 62-95, Art. 2

Description: Investment

 For an enterprise organized under foreign law to be established in

Guatemala, in any form, it must allocate an assigned amount of

capital for its operations in Guatemala, and execute a guarantee in

favor of third parties in an amount not less than the equivalent in

quetzales of US$ 50,000, which must remain in effect for the

duration of the enterprise’s operations in Guatemala.

 The exact amount of the guarantee shall be determined by the

Registro Mercantil, based on, among other factors, the amount of

the investment.

 For greater certainty, the requirement of a bond is not to be

construed to prevent an enterprise organized under the laws of a

foreign country from establishing in Guatemala.

 

ANNEX I, Schedule of Guatemala

I-GU-6

Sector: Forestry

Obligations Concerned: National Treatment (Article 10.3)

Level of Government: Central

Measures: Constitución Política de la República de Guatemala, Art. 126

Description: Investment

 Only Guatemalans by birth or enterprises organized under

Guatemalan law may exploit and renew forestry resources.

 

ANNEX I, Schedule of Guatemala

I-GU-7

Sector: Professional Services    Notaries

Obligations Concerned: National Treatment (Article 11.2)

    Local Presence (Article 11.5)

Level of Government: Central

Measures: Código de Notariado, Decree No. 314, Art. 2

Description: Cross-Border Services

 To practice as a notary public, an individual must be a Guatemalan

by birth domiciled in Guatemala.

 

 

ANNEX I, Schedule of Guatemala

I-GU-8

Sector: Professional Services

Obligations Concerned: National Treatment (Article 10.3)

Level of Government: Central

Measures: Código de Comercio, Decree No. 2-70, Art. 213

Description: Investment

 An enterprise organized under the laws of a foreign country that

supplies a professional service that requires a legally recognized

university degree, certificate, or diploma may not be established in

Guatemala.

 However, such an enterprise may supply its services in Guatemala

through a contract or other relationship with an enterprise

established in Guatemala.

ANNEX I, Schedule of Guatemala

I-GU-9

Sector: Performing Arts

Obligations Concerned: National Treatment (Article 11.2)

    Local Presence (Article 11.5)

Level of Government: Central

Measures: Ley de Espectáculos Públicos, Decree No. 574, Arts. 36, 37, and 49

 Acuerdo Ministerial No. 592-99 del Ministerio de Cultura y

Deportes, Art. 1

Description: Cross-Border Services

 Prior authorization from the Dirección de Espectáculos is required

to contract with foreign groups, enterprises, or artists.

 In order for foreign artists or artist groups to perform in Guatemala,

they must have a consent letter from any of the legally recognized

non-governmental artist unions in the country.

 In mixed performances, made up of one or more films and variety

shows, preference will be given to Guatemalans if the

circumstances of the cast, schedule, and contract so allow.

ANNEX I, Schedule of Guatemala

I-GU-10

Sector:  Tour Guides

Obligations Concerned: National Treatment (Article 11.2)

    Local Presence (Article 11.5)

Level of Government: Central

Measures: Acuerdo No. 219-87 del Instituto Guatemalteco de Turismo -

INGUAT- Funcionamiento de Guías de Turismo, Art. 6

Description: Cross-Border Services

 Only Guatemalans by birth or nationals of a foreign country that

are residents in Guatemala may provide tour guide services in

Guatemala.

 

ANNEX I, Schedule of Guatemala

I-GU-11

Sector: Specialty Air Services 

Obligations Concerned: Most-Favored-Nation Treatment (Article 11.3)

Level of Government: Central

Measures: Ley de Aviación Civil, Decreto del Congreso 93-2000, Art. 24

Description: Cross-Border Services

 In order to perform aeronautical duties on board foreign aircraft,

individuals are required to have a certificate, license, or the

equivalent, accepted by the Dirección General de Aeronáutica

Civil, or issued pursuant to an international agreement to which

Guatemala is a party, under conditions of reciprocity.

 

ANNEX I, Schedule of Guatemala

I-GU-12

Sector: Specialty Air Services

Obligations Concerned: National Treatment (Article 11.2)

Level of Government: Central

Measures: Ley de Aviación Civil, Decree No. 93-2000, Art. 62

Description: Cross-Border Services

 In the operation of specialty air services by Guatemalan operators,

all personnel performing aeronautical duties on board the aircraft

must be Guatemalans by birth.  However, the Dirección General de

Aeronáutica Civil may authorize foreign nationals to perform such

duties for a period not to exceed three months, counting from the

date of authorization.

 The Dirección General de Aeronáutica Civil may extend this

period if it determines that there are no such trained personnel in

Guatemala.

 

ANNEX I, Schedule of Guatemala

I-GU-13

Sector: Air Transportation

Obligations Concerned: National Treatment (Article 10.3)

  Senior Management and Boards of Directors (Article 10.10)

Level of Government: Central

Measures: Ley de Aviación Civil, Decree No. 93-2000, Art. 71 

Description: Investment

 Only Guatemalans by birth or enterprises organized under

Guatemalan law may operate commercial air transportation

services in Guatemala. 

 For greater certainty, commercial air transportation services

includes all domestic air transport, including of passengers, mail or

cargo. 

 In order to supply such services, an enterprise must also meet the

following requirements:

(a)     the enterprise must have its principal place of business in   

Guatemala; and

(b) at least one-half, plus 1, of the directors, managers and

individuals who have responsibility for management and

control of the enterprise must be Guatemalans by birth or be a

permanent resident of Guatemala.

 

Honduras Schedule

Schedule of Honduras

Sector:

 All Sectors 

Obligations Concerned:

 National Treatment (Article 10.3)

Level of Government: Central

 

Measures:

 

 

Decree No. 131, Constitución de la República, Title III, Chapter II,

Art. 107

 

Decree No. 90-1990, Ley para la Adquisición de Bienes Urbanos en

las Áreas que delimita el Artículo 107 de la Constitución de la

República,  Arts. 1 and 4

 

 Decree No. 968, Ley para la Declaratoria, Planeamiento y

Desarrollo de las Zonas de Turismo, Title V, Chapter V, Art. 16

 

Description:

 

 

Investment 

 

State land, common land, and private land within 40 kilometers of

the borders and coastlines, and such land on islands, keys, coral

reefs, breakwaters, rocks, and sand shoals in Honduras, can only be

acquired, possessed, or held under any title by Honduran nationals

by birth, by enterprises fully owned by Honduran nationals, and by

state institutions. 

 

Notwithstanding the preceding paragraph, any person may acquire,

possess, hold, or lease for up to 40 years (which may be renewed)

urban lands in such areas provided that it is certified and approved

for tourist purposes, economic or social development, or for the

public interest by the Secretaría de Estado en el Despacho de

Turismo.

 

Any person that acquires, possesses, or holds such urban land may

transfer that land only after prior authorization by the Secretaría de

Estado en el Despacho de Turismo.   

 

ANNEX I, Schedule of Honduras

 

 I-HO-2

 

Sector:

 All Sectors 

 

Obligations Concerned:

 

 

National Treatment (Article 10.3)

Most-Favored-Nation Treatment (Article 10.4)

Level of Government:

 Central

Measures:

 

 

 

Decree No. 131, Constitución de la República de Honduras,Title

VI, Chapter I, Art. 337  

 

Agreement No. 345-92, Reglamento de la Ley de Inversiones,

Chapters I and VI, Arts. 3 and 49  

 

Description:

 Investment

 

Small-scale industry and trade are reserved to Honduran persons.

 

Foreign investors cannot engage in small-scale industry or trade

unless they are naturalized citizens and their country of origin grants

reciprocity. 

 

“Small-scale industry and trade” means an enterprise with capital,

excluding land, buildings, and vehicles, of less than 150,000

Lempiras.

 

ANNEX I, Schedule of Honduras

 

 I-HO-3

 

Sector:

 All Sectors 

 

Obligations Concerned:

 National Treatment (Article 10.3)

Most-Favored-Nation Treatment (Article 10.4)

 

Level of Government:

 Central

Measures:

  Decree No. 65-87, May 20, 1987, Ley de Cooperativas de

Honduras, Title II, Chapter I, Arts. 18 and 19

 

Agreement No. 191-88, May 30, 1988, Reglamento de la Ley de

Cooperativas de Honduras, Art. 34(c) and (d)

 

Description:

 Investment

 

Non-Honduran cooperatives may establish in Honduras if they

receive authorization from the Instituto Hondureño de

Cooperativas.  Authorization will be granted if:

(a)  reciprocity exists in the country of origin; and 

(b)  the non-Honduran cooperative has at least one permanent

legal representative in Honduras.  

 

 

ANNEX I, Schedule of Honduras

 

 I-HO-4

 

Sector:

 Customs Agents and Customs Agencies

Obligations Concerned:

 National Treatment (Article 10.3 and 11.2)

 

Level of Government:

 Central

Measures:

  Decree No. 212-87, Ley de Aduanas, Title IX, Chapter I, First and

Third Sections, Arts. 177 and 182

 

Description:

 Cross-Border Services and Investment

 

Licensed customs agents must be Honduran nationals by birth.

 

Employees of the customs agent, who act on behalf of the customs

agent, also must be Honduran nationals by birth. 

 

 

ANNEX I, Schedule of Honduras

 

 I-HO-5

 

Sector:

 Agricultural

Obligations Concerned:

 National Treatment (Article 10.3)

Level of Government:

  Central

Measures:

 

 

Agreement No. 2124-92, Reglamento de Adjudicación de Tierras en

la Reforma Agraria, Arts. 1 and 2 

 

Description:

 

 

Investment

 

Agrarian reform beneficiaries must be Honduran nationals by birth,

individually or organized in peasant cooperatives or other peasant

enterprises.

 

ANNEX I, Schedule of Honduras

 

 I-HO-6

 

Sector:

 Communications Services – Mail

Obligations Concerned:

 Market Access (11.4)

Level of Government: Central

 

Measures:  Decree No. 120-93, Ley Orgánica de le Empresa de Correos de

Honduras, Arts. 3 and 4

 

Description: Cross-Border Services

 

The operation of the mail system in Honduras is reserved

exclusively to the Empresa Hondureña de Correos

(HONDUCOR).1

 

                                                

1

  However, this exclusivity does not apply to the supply of express delivery services.

ANNEX I, Schedule of Honduras

 

 I-HO-7

 

Sector:

 Radio, Television, and Newspaper Services

Obligations Concerned:

 Senior Management and Boards of Directors (Article 10.10)

Level of Government:

 Central

Measures:

 Decree No. 131, Constitución de la República de Honduras,

Chapter II, Art. 73, third paragraph

 

Decree No. 6, Ley de Emisión del Pensamiento, Chapter IV, Art. 30

 

 Decree No. 759, Ley del Colegio de Periodistas de Honduras, Art.

8, amended by Decree No. 79, January 1, 1981

 

Description:

 

 

 

Investment

 

Only Honduran nationals by birth may exercise senior management

of newspapers or free over the air broadcast (radio and television)

news media, including its intellectual, political, and administrative

orientation.2 

 

 

                                                

2

  This does not apply to newspapers or news media that are established outside Honduras.

ANNEX I, Schedule of Honduras

 

 I-HO-8

 

Sector:

 Telecommunications

Obligations Concerned:

 National Treatment (Article 11.2)

Level of Government:

 Central

Measures:

  Decree No.185-95, Ley Marco del Sector Telecomunicaciones,

Chapter I, Art. 26

 

Agreement No. 141-2002, Reglamento General de la Ley Marco del

Sector de Telecomunicaciones, December 26, 2002, Title III,

Chapter I, Art. 93

 

Description:

 Cross-Border Services

 

Foreign governments may not directly participate in the provision of

public telecommunications services.

 

ANNEX I, Schedule of Honduras

 

 I-HO-9

 

Sector:

 Telecommunications

Obligations Concerned:

  Market Access (Article 11.4)

Level of Government:

 Central

Measures:

 Decree No. 244-98, October 2, 1998, Art.1 

 

Description:

 Cross-Border Services

 

The Empresa Hondureña de Telecomunicaciones (HONDUTEL)

has the exclusive right to provide national and international

telecommunications services throughout the territory of Honduras,

such as: carrier, telex, telephone and telegraph services, including

telegraph services in places where there is no other means of

communication with the rest of the country.  HONDUTEL shall

benefit from the exclusive right to provide such services until

December 24, 2005.

 

Timetable for reduction:

 Starting on December 25, 2005, HONDUTEL shall no longer have

the exclusive right to provide national and international

telecommunications services throughout the territory of Honduras,

such as: carrier, telex, telephone and telegraph services, including

telegraph services in places where there is no other means of

communication with the rest of the country.

ANNEX I, Schedule of Honduras

 

 I-HO-10

 

Sector:

 Construction or Consulting Services and Related Engineering

Services  – Civil Engineering

 

Obligations Concerned:

 National Treatment (Articles 10.3 and 11.2)

Most-Favored-Nation Treatment (Article11.3)

Market Access (Article 11.4)

Local Presence (Article 11.5)

 

Level of Government: Central

 

Measures:  Decree No. 47-1987, Ley Orgánica del Colegio de Ingenieros

Civiles de Honduras, Art. 67

 

Reglamento de Ley Orgánica del Colegio de Ingenieros Civiles de

Honduras, Arts. 100 (A) – (D) and 101

 

 Decree No. 753, Ley Orgánica del Colegio de Arquitectos de

Honduras, Art. 37(b), (c), (d), (g), and (h)

 

Reglamento de Ley Orgánica del Colegio de Arquitectos de

Honduras, Arts. 4(h), 7(a), (c), (d) and (h), 13, 68, and 69

 

Decree No. 902, Ley Orgánica del Colegio de Ingenieros

Mecánicos, Electricistas y Químicos de Honduras, Art. 40 (c), (d),

and (h)

 

 

Description:

 

 

Cross-Border Services and Investment

Consulting and construction enterprises must be organized under

Honduran law in order to be members of the Colegio de Ingenieros

Civiles de Honduras (CICH) and to perform civil engineering

projects in Honduras.  For greater certainty, consulting and

construction enterprises organized under foreign law may register

provisionally with the CICH to perform specific civil engineering

projects.  Higher membership fees apply to foreign-owned

enterprises.  In addition, foreign workers must be authorized by the

CICH in order to work on such projects.

 

 

ANNEX I, Schedule of Honduras

 

 I-HO-11

 

Sector:

 Distribution Services    Petroleum Products (Liquid Fuel,

Automotive Oil, Diesel, Kerosene, and LPG)

 

Obligations Concerned:

 

 

National Treatment (Article 10.3)

Local Presence (Article 11. 5) 

 

Level of Government:

 Central

Measures:

  Decree No. 549, Ley de Representantes, Distribuidores y Agentes

de Empresas Nacionales y Extranjeras, Chapter I and VI, Arts. 4

and 25  

 

Decree No. 804, amending Art. 4 of the Ley de Representantes,

Distribuidores y Agentes de Empresas Nacionales y Extranjera 

 

Description:

 

 

Cross-Border Services and Investment

 

Only Honduran nationals and enterprises organized under Honduran

law may be authorized to sell petroleum products.  Enterprises must

be at least 51 percent owned by Honduran nationals.   

ANNEX I, Schedule of Honduras

 

 I-HO-12

 

Sector:

 Electricity

Obligations Concerned:

 Market Access (Article 11.4)

 

Level of Government:

 Central

Measures: Decree No. 158-94, Ley Marco del Sub Sector Eléctrico, November

26, 1994, Chapter V, Art. 15

 

Description: Cross-Border Services  

 

Only the Honduran Government, through the Empresa Nacional de

Energía Eléctrica, may transmit electricity or operate the electricity

transmission system and dispatch center.

 

 

ANNEX I, Schedule of Honduras

 

 I-HO-13

 

Sector:

 Lotteries

Obligations Concerned: Market Access (Article 11.4)

 

Level of Government: Central

 

Measures: Ley Orgánica de la Loteria Nacional, Decree No. 438, April 23,

1977, Art. 5(c)

 

Description: Cross-Border Services  

 

The Patronato Nacional de la Infancia (PANI) exclusively

administers the national lottery.

 

 

ANNEX I, Schedule of Honduras

 

 I-HO-14

 

Sector: 

 

 

Education Services Private Preschool, Primary, and Secondary

Educational Services

Obligations Concerned: National Treatment (Article 11.2)

Most-Favored-Nation Treatment (Article 11.3)

Local Presence (Article 11.5)

Senior Management and Boards of Directors (Article 10.10)

 

Level of Government: Central

 

Measures: Decree No. 131, Constitución de la República, Title III, Chapter

VIII, Arts. 34, 166, and 168  

 

Decree No. 79, Ley Orgánica de Educación, Arts. 64 and 65 

 

Decree No. 136-97, Ley del Estatuto del Docente, Arts. 7 and 8

 

Executive Agreement No. 0760-5E-99, Reglamento General del

Estatuto del Docente, Art. 6

 

Description:  Cross-Border Services and Investment

 

A school director or supervisor must be a Honduran national by

birth.

 

Teachers at all levels of the education system must be Honduran

nationals by birth.  Foreign nationals may, however, teach particular

subjects at the middle and high school levels if there are no such

Honduran nationals available to teach such subjects. 

Notwithstanding the preceding sentence, foreign nationals may

teach the Constitution, civic education, geography, and the history

of Honduras only if there is reciprocity for Honduran nationals in

their country of origin.

 

Private schools at all levels must be organized under Honduran law. 

For greater certainty, there are no restrictions on foreign ownership

of such schools.

 

ANNEX I, Schedule of Honduras

 

 I-HO-15

 

Sector:

 Entertainment Services – Music Entertainers

 

Obligations Concerned:

 National Treatment (Articles 10.3 and 11.2)

 

Level of Government: Central

 

Measures:

 

 

Decree No. 123, October 23, 1968, Ley de Protección a los Artistas

Musicales,  Arts. 1 – 4

Description:

 Cross-Border Services and Investment

 

Notwithstanding the measure listed above, Honduras agrees that

foreign music artists who wish to perform individually or as a group

in Honduras must pay five percent of the contracted fee to the Artist

Union of Honduras and the manager or leaser shall, if possible,

contract local artists to perform during the same performance.  

 

For greater certainty, foreign music artists must register with the

Artist Union of Honduras for each performance in Honduras.

ANNEX I, Schedule of Honduras

 

 I-HO-16

 

Sector:

 Championships and Soccer Games Services

Obligations Concerned:

 

 

National Treatment (Article 11.2)

Most-Favored-Nation Treatment (Article 11.3)

Local Presence (Article 11.5)

 

Level of Government:

 Central

Measures:

 Reglamento de Campeonatos y Competencias Liga Nacional de

Fútbol No Aficionado de Primera División, Arts. 9 and 10  

 

Description:

 Cross-Border Services

 

Foreign nationals that are players in the Honduran national soccer

league must be temporarily resident in Honduras.  Each team in

such league may register a maximum of four foreign players, one of

whom must be a national from a Central American country.

 

ANNEX I, Schedule of Honduras

 

 I-HO-17

 

Sector:

 

 

Amusement, Cultural, and Sports Services    Casinos and

Gambling (Encompasses Roulette, Cards, Punter, Baccarat, Slot

Machines, and the Like)

 

Obligations Concerned:

 

 

National Treatment (Article 10.3)

Local Presence (Article 11.5)

 

Level of Government:

 Central

Measures:

 

 

 Decree No. 488, February 16, 1977, Ley de Casinos de Juegos de

Envite o Azar, Art. 3 

 

Description

 Cross-Border Services and Investment

 

Only Hondurans nationals by birth and enterprises organized under

Honduran law may operate a casino.

 

 

ANNEX I, Schedule of Honduras

 

 I-HO-18

 

Sector:

 Environmental Services

Obligations Concerned: Market Access (Article 11.4)

 

Level of Government: Central

 

Measures: Decree No. 134-90, Ley de Municipalidades, Art. 13(3) and (4)  

 

Decree No. 104-93, Ley General del Ambiente, Arts. 29 and 67

 

Description: Cross-Border Services

 

Only the State, through its municipalities, may provide public water

distribution, waste disposal, and sanitation and hygiene services. 

For greater certainty, municipalities are responsible for the

construction of aqueducts, the maintenance and administration of

potable water, sanitary sewerage, and drainage, and the promotion

and development of related projects.

 

 

ANNEX I, Schedule of Honduras

 

 I-HO-19

 

Sector:

 Distribution, Wholesale and Retail – Weapons, Munitions, and

Other Related Items

 

Obligations Concerned: Market Access (Article 11.4)

 

Level of Government: Central

 

Measures: Decree No. 131, Constitución de la República, Title V, Chapter X,

Art. 292

 

Decree No. 80-92, Ley de Inversiones, Chapter VI, Art.16

 

Description: Cross-Border Services

 

The wholesale and retail distribution of the following items are

reserved solely for the Fuerzas Armadas de Honduras:

 

munitions;

warplanes,

military rifles,

all classes of pistols and revolvers, 41 caliber or higher;

Honduran Army standard-issue pistols;

silencers for all classes of firearms;

firearms;

accessories and munitions;

cartridges for firearms;

apparatus and other accessories required to load

cartridges;

gunpowder, explosives, caps, and fuses;

gas masks; and

air rifles.

 

For greater certainty, use of explosives for commercial purposes

may be permitted by the appropriate Honduran authority.

 

 

 

ANNEX I, Schedule of Honduras

 

 I-HO-20

 

Sector:

 Investigation and Security Services

Obligations Concerned:

 

 

National Treatment (Article 10.3)

Senior Management and Boards of Directors (Article 10.10)

 

Level of Government:

 Central

Measures:

  Decree No. 156-98, Ley Orgánica de la Policía Nacional, Art.91 

Description:

 Investment 

 

In order to be established in Honduras, foreign private security

enterprises must partner with Honduran enterprises working in the

same field and appoint a Honduran national by birth as a senior

manager.

 

 

ANNEX I, Schedule of Honduras

 

 I-HO-21

 

Sector:

 Fisheries

 

Obligations Concerned:

 National Treatment (Article 10.3)

 

Level of Government:

 Central

Measures:

  Decree No. 154, Ley de Pesca, Chapter IV, Arts. 20, 26, and 29  

 

Description :

 Investment

 

Only Honduran nationals resident in Honduras and enterprises

organized under Honduran law at least 51 percent owned by

Honduran nationals can engage in commercial fishing in the

territorial waters, rivers, and lakes in Honduras.  For greater

certainty, only Honduran flag vessels can perform commercial

fishing activities in territorial waters in Honduras.

 

For greater certainty, only Honduran nationals by birth can be

captains of commercial fishing vessels.   

 

ANNEX I, Schedule of Honduras

 

 I-HO-22

 

Sector:

 Professional Services

Obligations Concerned:

 National Treatment (Article 11.2)

Most-Favored-Nation Treatment  (Article 11.3)

Local Presence (Article 11.5)

 

Level of Government:

 Central

Measures: Decree No. 131, Constitución de la República de Honduras,

Chapter VIII, Art. 177

 

Reglamento para el Reconocimiento de Estudios Universitarios e

Incorporación de Profesionales, Arts. 2, 11, and 18 

 

Description: Cross-Border Services

 

Notwithstanding existing measures relating to requirements for the

practice of professions, including the measures listed above,

Honduras agrees that authorization for professional practice will be

granted based on principles of reciprocity.

 

Honduras agrees that if a jurisdiction in the United States recognizes

professional degrees awarded by Honduran educational institutions,

then Honduras will recognize equivalent professional degrees

awarded by U.S. educational institutions.   

 

Likewise, Honduras agrees that if a jurisdiction in the United States

allows Honduran nationals to apply for and receive a license or

certificate for the provision of a professional service, then Honduras

will allow U.S. nationals to apply for and receive an equivalent

license or certificate.

 

For greater certainty, the preceding paragraphs do not grant the

automatic recognition of professional degrees or right to practice a

profession, nor do they eliminate the nationality requirement for

certain professions reserved exclusively for Honduran nationals, as

provided for in Annexes I or II.

 

In addition, the relevant professional association in Honduras will

recognize a license granted by a jurisdiction in the United States,

and allow the holder of that license to register with the association

and practice the profession in Honduras on a temporary basis based

on the license issued in a jurisdiction in the United States, in the

following cases:

ANNEX I, Schedule of Honduras

 

 I-HO-23

(a) no educational institution in Honduras offers a course of study

that would allow the practice of the profession in Honduras;

(b) the holder of  the license is a recognized expert in the

profession; or

(c) allowing the professional to practice in Honduras will, through

training, demonstration, or other such opportunity, further the

development of the profession in Honduras.

ANNEX I, Schedule of Honduras

 

 I-HO-24

 

Sector:

 Air Transportation

Obligations Concerned:

 National Treatment (Article 10.3)

Senior Management and Boards of Directors (Article 10.10)

 

Level of Government: Central

 

Measures:

 

 

Decree No. 146, Ley de Aeronáutica Civil, Chapter X, Second,

Third, and Fourth Sections, Art.80 

Description:

 

 

Investment 

 

Only Honduran nationals and enterprises organized under Honduran

law may supply domestic and international commercial public air

transportation services by means of a Honduran flag aircraft.

 

Such enterprises must be controlled and at least 51 percent owned

by Honduran nationals.

 

ANNEX I, Schedule of Honduras

 

 I-HO-25

 

Sector:

 Air Transportation

Obligations Concerned:

 National Treatment (Article 11.2)

Most-Favored-Nation Treatment  (Article 11.3)

Local Presence (Article 11.5)

 

Level of Government:

 Central

Measures:

 

 

Decree No. 146, Ley de Aeronáutica Civil, Chapter X, Second,

Third, and Fourth Sections, Arts. 37, 125, and 126

Description:

 

 

Cross-Border Services

 

Private specialty air transportation services for remuneration can

only be provided by Honduran nationals or enterprises organized

under Honduran law and must be authorized by the Secretaría de

Obras Públicas, Transporte y Vivienda.

 

When Honduran personnel are not available to perform such

activities, foreign pilots or other technical personnel may be allowed

to exercise such activities, with preference given to qualified

personnel from any Central American country.

 

 

ANNEX I, Schedule of Honduras

 

 I-HO-26

 

Sector:

 Maritime Transportation - Coastal Navigation

Obligations Concerned:

 National Treatment (Articles 10.3 and 11.2)

Most-Favored-Nation Treatment (Articles 10.4 and 11.3)

Local Presence (Article 11.5)

 

Level of Government:

 Central

Measures:

 

 

 

 

 

 Decree No. 167-94, January 2, 1995, Ley Orgánica de la Marina

Mercante Nacional, Title II, III, Chapter VII, Art. 40 

 

Agreement No. 000764, December 13, 1997, Reglamento de

Transporte Marítimo, Art. 6

Description:

 

 

Cross-Border Services and Investment

 

Coastal navigation for commercial purposes is reserved for

Honduran merchant vessels.  If there are no Honduran merchant

vessels, or if they are not available, and for the time period that such

circumstances exist, the Dirección General de la Marina Mercante

may authorize foreign merchant vessels to provide coastal

navigation in Honduras.  In such circumstances, preference shall be

given to Central American flag vessels. 

 

Honduran merchant vessels must be organized under Honduran law,

at least 51 percent of its subscribed and paid-in share capital must be

owned by Honduran nationals, and the company must be domiciled

in Honduras.

ANNEX I, Schedule of Honduras

 

 I-HO-27

 

Sector:

 Land Transportation

Obligations Concerned:

 National Treatment (Articles 10.3 and 11.2)

Most-Favored-Nation Treatment (Article 11.3)

Market Access (Article 11.4)

Local Presence (Article 11.5)

 

Level of Government:

 Central

Measures:

 

 

 

 

 

 Decree No. 319-1976, Ley de Transporte Terrestre, Arts. 3, 5, 17,

18, 27, and 28

 

 Agreement No. 200, Reglamento de la Ley de Transporte Terrestre,

Arts. 1, 7, 32, 33, and 34

Description:

 

 

 

Cross-Border Services and Investment

 

Public domestic land passenger and cargo transportation services

may be supplied only by Honduran nationals and enterprises that are

organized under Honduran law and at least 51 percent owned by

Honduran nationals.  It is necessary to obtain a certificate of

operation from the Dirección General de Transporte de la

Secretaría de Obras Públicas, Transporte y Vivienda (SOPTRAVI),

which is subject to an economic needs test.

 

Public international land passenger and cargo transportation services

may be supplied by foreign nationals and enterprises organized

under foreign law based on reciprocity, but authorization for

particular routes will be granted on a preferential basis to Honduran

nationals and to enterprises organized under Honduran law.

 

ANNEX I, Schedule of Honduras

 

 I-HO-28

 

Sector:

 Transportation – Railways

Obligations Concerned 

 National Treatment (Article 10.3)

Senior Management and Boards of Directors (Article 10.10)

 

Level of Government:

 Central

Measures: Decree No. 48, Ley Constitutiva del Ferrocarril Nacional de

Honduras, Chapters I and VIII, Arts. 32 and 12 (amended by Decree

No. 54)

 

Description:

 

 

 

Investment

 

The Ferrocarril Nacional de Honduras may only sell its

subsidiaries to Honduran nationals and enterprises organized under

Honduran law. 

 

The senior manager of the Ferrocarril Nacional de Honduras must

be a Honduran national by birth.

 

 

ANNEX I, Schedule of Honduras

 

 I-HO-29

 

Sector: Other Business Services – Warehousing

 

Obligations Concerned:

 Market Access (Article 11.4)

Level of Government: Central

 

Measures:

 

 

Agreement No. 1055, Reglamento de los Almacenes Generales de

Depositos, Art. 3

Description: Cross-Border Services

 

Only enterprises organized under Honduran law with fixed capital

and the sole purpose of providing warehousing services shall be

authorized to provide such services.

 

 

ANNEX I, Schedule of Honduras

 

 I-HO-30

 

Sector:

 Business Consulting Services 

 

Obligations Concerned: National Treatment (Article 11.2)

Most-Favored-Nation Treatment (Article 11.3)

Market Access (Article 11.4)

 

Level of Government: Central

 

Measures: Decree No. 900, Ley Orgánica del Colegio de Administradores de

Empresas de Honduras, Arts. 61-E and 61-F

 

Reglamento de Ley Orgánica del Colegio de Administradores de

Empresas de Honduras, Arts. 96, 111, 113, and 114

 

Description: Cross-Border Services

 

Foreign nationals may enter into contracts to provide business

administration consulting services after confirmation of the contract

by the Colegio de Administradores de Empresas de Honduras.

 

Enterprises organized under foreign law may enter into contracts to

provide business administration consulting services after

confirmation of the contract by the Colegio de Administradores de

Empresas de Honduras if such services are not otherwise available

in Honduras or because of contractual needs.  In order to provide

such services, such enterprises must form a partnership with

Honduran firms that are duly registered with the Colegio de

Administradores de Empresas de Honduras.

 

Foreign nationals and enterprises organized under foreign law must

pay registration fees that are higher than those imposed on

Honduran nationals and enterprises organized under Honduran law.

 

ANNEX I, Schedule of Honduras

 

 I-HO-31

 

Sector:  Economic Consulting Services

 

Obligations Concerned:

 Local Presence (Article 11.5)

Level of Government:

 Central

Measures:  Decree No. 1002, Ley Orgánica del Colegio Hondureño de

Economistas, Art. 58

 

Description: Cross-Border Services

 

In order to provide economic consulting services into the territory of

Honduras, economic consulting enterprises organized under foreign

law must be represented by a member of the Colegio Hondureño de

Economistas.

 

ANNEX I, Schedule of Honduras

 

 I-HO-32

 

Sector: Agricultural Engineering and Agronomy  

 

Obligations Concerned: National Treatment (Article 11.2)

Most-Favored-Nation Treatment (Article 11.3)

 

Level of Government: Central

 

Measures: Decree No. 148-95, Ley Orgánica del Colegio de Profesionales en

Ciencias Agrícolas de Honduras, Art. 5

 

Reglamento de la Ley Orgánica del Colegio de Profesionales en

Ciencias Agrícolas de Honduras, Art. 9 and Tabla de Pagos al

COLPROCAH 

 

Description: Cross-Border Services 

 

Foreign agricultural engineers and agronomists may be subject to

higher professional association registration fees than those imposed

on Honduran agricultural engineers and agronomists.

 

 

ANNEX I, Schedule of Honduras

 

 I-HO-33

 

Sector: Forestry Engineers

 

Obligations Concerned: National Treatment (Article 11.2)

Local Presence (Article 11.5)

 

Level of Government: Central

 

Measures: Ley Orgánica del Colegio de Ingenieros Forestales de Honduras,

Art. 66 

 

Description: Cross-Border Services  

 

Forestry engineering consulting enterprises organized under foreign

law must hire Honduran nationals that are members of the

Association of Forestry Engineers of Honduras in a proportion

meaningful to the size of the project.

ANNEX I, Schedule of Honduras

 

 I-HO-34

 

Sector: Veterinarians

 

Obligations Concerned: National Treatment (Article 11.2)

Most-Favored-Nation Treatment (Article 11.3)

Local Presence (Article 11.5)

 

Level of Government: Central

 

Measures: Ley Orgánica del Colegio de Veterinarios de Honduras, Art. 12

 

Reglamento de la Ley Orgánica del Colegio de Médicos

Veterinarios de Honduras, Art. 5

 

Description: Cross-Border Services

 

Foreign enterprises wishing to supply veterinary services in

Honduras must be organized under Honduran law.  Foreign

veterinarians may be subject to higher professional association fees

than those imposed on Central American veterinarians.

 

ANNEX I, Schedule of Honduras

 

 I-HO-35

 

Sector:

 Microbiologists and Clinicians

Obligations Concerned:

 National Treatment (Article 11.2)

Level of Government: Central

 

Measures: Reglamento de Inscripción del Colegio de Microbiólogos y

Químicos Clínicos, Arts. 5, 6, and 8

 

Description: Cross-Border Services

 

Foreign microbiologists and clinicians must pay a higher

registration fee than those paid by Honduran microbiologists and

clinicians.

 

 

ANNEX I, Schedule of Honduras

 

 I-HO-36

 

Sector:

 Notaries

Obligations Concerned: National Treatment (Article 11.2)

 

Level of Government: Central

 

Measures:  Decree No. 277-2002, August 16, 2002, Ley del Notariado, Art. 4

 

Description: Cross-Border Services 

 

Notaries must be Honduran nationals.

 

ANNEX I, Schedule of Honduras

 

 I-HO-37

 

Sector:

 Electrical Energy Services

Obligations Concerned: Market Access (Article 11.4)

 

Level of Government: Central

 

Measures: Decree No. 158-94, Ley Marco del Sub-sector Eléctrico, Art. 23

 

Description: Cross-Border Services 

 

In order to be established in Honduras and supply electrical energy

distribution services, an enterprise must be organized as a

commercial corporation with nominative stock.

 

 

 

 

ANNEX I, Schedule of Honduras

 

 I-HO-38

 

Sector:

 Telecommunications

Obligations Concerned: Market Access (Article 11.4)

 

Level of Government: Central

 

Measures: Decree No. 80-2003, Art. 1(3.5)

 

Executive Decree No. PCM-018-2003, October 2, 2003, Art. 1, No.

IV (a)

 

Decree No. 109-2003, October 24, 2003, Art. 1, No. IV (a)

 

Description: Cross-Border Services 

 

The Comisión Nacional de Telecomunicaciones (CONATEL) will

not authorize additional mobile telephony operators until December

2005.  CONATEL will authorize at least one additional operator

after that date.

 

ANNEX I, Schedule of Honduras

 

 I-HO-39

 

Sector:

 Public Accountants

Obligations Concerned: Local Presence (Article 11.5)

 

Level of Government: Central

 

Measures:  Decree No. 19-93, Ley Orgánica del Colegio de Profesionales

Universitarios en Contaduría Pública, Art. 23

 

Description: Cross-Border Services 

 

Any person wishing to supply public accountancy services in the

territory of Honduras must be organized under Honduran law.

 

ANNEX I, Schedule of Honduras

 

 I-HO-40

 

Sector:

 Architects

Obligations Concerned: Local Presence (Article 11.5)

 

Level of Government: Central

 

Measures: Reglamento Interno Colegio de Arquitectos de Honduras, Art. 7(c)

and (d) 

 

Description: Cross-Border Services 

 

Enterprises organized under foreign law must designate a member

of the Colegio de Arquitectos de Honduras (CAH) as their

representative prior to registering with the CAH to supply

architectural services in Honduras.  For greater certainty, enterprises

organized under foreign law may only register for specific projects. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Nicaragua Schedule

Schedule of Nicaragua

Sector:  Musicians and Artists

Obligations Concerned:  National Treatment (Article 11.2)

  Most-Favored-Nation Treatment (Article 11.3)

Measures:  Ley de Promoción a las Expresiones Artísticas Nacionales y de

Protección a los Artistas Nicaragüenses, Law No. 215, published

in  La Gaceta No. 134, July 17, 1996, Arts. 14, 23, 24, 25, and 31

Description:  Cross-Border Services

 Foreign artists or musical bands may perform in Nicaragua solely

by means of a prior contract.

 Foreign artists performing shows or reviews of a commercial nature

shall include in their program a Nicaraguan artist or group that

performs similar shows. 

 Foreign artists or artistic groups not wishing to include a national

artist in their program must pay one percent of the show’s net

receipts to the Instituto Nicaragüense de Cultura unless the foreign

artists’ or groups’ country of origin does not levy such tax on

Nicaraguan artists or artistic groups. 

 Foreigners selected for the design and construction of public,

pictorial, or sculptural monuments erected in Nicaragua, shall do so

in association with Nicaraguan artists.

 

 

 

ANNEX I, Schedule of Nicaragua

 

I-NI-2

Sector: Tourism    Hotels, Restaurants, Tour Guides, Car Rental, and

Other Tourism Related Activities.

Obligations Concerned:  National Treatment (Article11.2)

  Local Presence (Article 11.5)

 

Measures: Ley de Incentivos a la Industria Turística de la República de

Nicaragua, Law No. 306, published in La Gaceta No. 117, June 21,

1999, Arts. 16.1 and 16.2 

 

Reglamento de Empresas y Actividades Turísticas de Nicaragua,

published in La Gaceta No. 99, May 28, 2001, Arts. 16 and 17  

 

Reglamento de los Operadores de Viajes de Nicaragua, published

in La Gaceta No. 100, May 29, 2001, Art. 8 

 

Reglamento que Regula las Actividades de las Empresas

Arrendadoras de Vehículos Automotrices y Acuáticos (Rent a Car),

published in La Gaceta No. 108, June 8, 2001, Art. 9 

 

 Reglamento de Guías de Turistas, published in La Gaceta No. 40,

February 26, 2001, Art. 9

 

 Reglamento de Agencias de Viajes de Nicaragua, published in La

Gaceta No. 96, May 21, 2001, Art. 5

Description:  Cross-Border Services 

 In order to supply tourism services in Nicaragua an enterprise must

be organized under Nicaraguan law; and a foreign national must

reside in Nicaragua or appoint a legal representative in Nicaragua.

 This paragraph does not apply to the supply of tourism services

during a cruise. 

 Tour Guides must be Nicaraguan nationals.

ANNEX I, Schedule of Nicaragua

 

I-NI-3

Sector:  Services Related to Construction 

Obligations Concerned: National Treatment (Article 11.2)

  Local Presence (Article 11.5)

 

Measures: Ley Reguladora de la Actividad de Diseño y Construcción, Decree

No. 237, December 1, 1986, Arts. 2, 4, and 6

 

Description: Cross-Border Services 

 In order to supply construction services in Nicaragua an enterprise

must be organized under Nicaraguan law; and a foreign national

must reside in Nicaragua or appoint a legal representative in

Nicaragua.

 

 

ANNEX I, Schedule of Nicaragua

 

I-NI-4

Sector: Distribution of Fireworks, Firearms, and Munitions 

Affected Obligation: National Treatment (Article 11.2)

 Local Presence (Article 11.5)

 

Measures: Reglamento de la Ley de la Policía Nacional, Decree No. 26-96,

published in La Gaceta No. 32, February 14, 1996, Arts. 76 and 77

Description: Cross-Border Services

 In order to engage in the distribution of fireworks, firearms, and

munitions in Nicaragua an enterprise must be organized under

Nicaraguan law; and a foreign national must reside in Nicaragua. 

 

 

ANNEX I, Schedule of Nicaragua

 

I-NI-5

Sector:  Private Security Services

Obligations Concerned: National Treatment (Art